Mandela Effect – Geography Survey 1 Results

With over 60 points to plot on a map, I’d hoped to see some strong patterns from our first geographic survey. Instead, while I saw a few surprises, nothing seemed conclusive at first glance.

Of course, these early map results rely on accurate reports by those who left comments, and accurate results from the mapmakers at GPS Visualizer. In addition, this is a very small sampling and doesn’t include reports from the “moving” geography sections of this site.

Here’s the world map, with one red dot per reported location from the survey:

Mandela Effect map 1 - world
All maps on this page courtesy GPSVisualizer.com, (c)2016 Google, NASA, INEGI

Mandela Effect line - France to N. AfricaAlmost immediately, two vertical lines stand out.

The first goes from about 6 km WSW of Fay, France (SW of Paris) to about 220 km west of Kidal, Mali. That line is extraordinarily straight. It’s shown on the map to the right. (Click map to see it much larger.)

The second surprisingly straight, vertical line goes from a point about 15 km northeast of Surrey, near Vancouver, Canada, to several points near Santa Cruz, California (USA).

Mandela Effect map - Vancouver to Santa CruzThat map is on the left. (Click map to see it larger).

One location along that line was particularly surprising. On the map, it’s the northernmost red dot in California.

When I expanded the map to see local details, the location is slightly south of Yreka, California. (It’s pronounced “why-REEK-uh.”)

In that part of California, I’d expected to see a report or two nearer to Mt. Shasta, which has a long history of paranormal activity, including Native American lore and Frederick Spenser Oliver’s novel, A Dweller On Two Planets.

However, the line through northern California is considerably west of Mt. Shasta. That’s disappointing, but I’ve never explored Mt. Shasta to confirm its activity.

Several other lines cross the United States. On their own, they’re inconclusive.

Here’s the US-Canada Map. (Click map to see it larger.)

MeGeog1-USA

For me to take any of these lines seriously, I’d need more compelling evidence. Also, from my own ley line studies: when one genuinely anomalous line crosses a second one, their intersection is usually very active. With the possible exception of the X near Phoenix, Arizona, nothing seems promising… yet.

Line-by-line US/Canada Map

At a quick glance — not enough to reach reliable conclusions (so take this summary with a grain of salt) — here’s what I see:

Using dots on this map to construct a few lines, the most promising one (Line #2) passes through Arizona. Even that isn’t impressive, though it includes Portland, Las Vegas, and Phoenix, and seems to pass through Area 51. Due its the Las Vegas and Area 51 connections, I’ll explore this line further.

Line #1 includes the “hot spot” near Santa Cruz, plus Los Angeles and San Diego. I haven’t spent much time in Santa Cruz, and nothing about Los Angeles would surprise me, but San Diego has always seemed fairly benign.

Line #3 connects Denver and multiple spots in Arizona, but entirely misses some of the most legendary (anomalous) locations in South Dakota.

Line #4 (turquoise) connects several Canadian locations I’ve studied. It continues through Detroit, a somewhat turbulent city, and then approaches El Paso (TX), which no one reported. So, that line has some potential at its northernmost points, but — so far — that’s all.

Line #5 goes through Atlanta (GA), Nashville (TN), and Marshalltown (IA). I need to compare it to my ley line maps of Georgia.

Line #6 tracks through Vermont, New York City, and eastern New Jersey. Due to the density of population along much of the line, it’s difficult to separate geography from history, but I’ve studied many locations along that line; it could be useful.

Conclusions

At the moment, I feel that the points and lines indicate where site visitors are or have been, and that’s all.

I was hoping for clearer results.

Of course, the sampling was tiny. It’s too early to close the door on geography or even ley lines helping us understand (or even predict) the Mandela Effect.

Also, I didn’t plot all possible lines. For example, a line connecting Brussels (Belgium) to a point slightly west of Port Macquarie (Australia) might offer some insights.

I haven’t entered data from articles about “moving” geography, either.

What’s next for my geographic studies:

  • Verify this world map. Make sure the locations (reported points) are correctly placed.
  • Take a closer look at the two vertical lines on this early map.
  • Add points from geography-related comments at this site.
  • Plot additional points & lines based on the IP numbers of the first 200 (or so) people to find this website and comment at it.
  • Look for additional points (on or off existing lines) that fit my ley line theories.
  • Compare all lines with vile vortices and my own ley line maps.

If you’d like to study this yourself, here’s a TXT file with the latitudes and longitudes, followed by point numbers for use at GPSVisualizer.com and similar mapping sites: http://mandelaeffect.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/MEGeo61-6Jan2016.txt (You may want to check it against comments at the survey post, for typos.)

If you see data or “coincidences” I missed, or if you pursue this and uncover anything helpful, leave a comment. (Mike H., I’m especially interested in how these lines relate — or don’t — to your geography patterns.)

Las Vegas Anomalies – Late Dec 2015

Las Vegas
Las Vegas photos courtesy Justin Taylor and Freeimages.com

Several odd things happened in Las Vegas in late December 2015. In a city where “odd” is a way of life, anything beyond their “normal” is especially interesting.

This is a good example of data points — a specific location and closely connected events (times) — that are useful for my research. However, this may (or may not) relate to the Mandela Effect, per se.

Two rare events happened on the night of 20 Dec 2015.

Las Vegas Anomaly #1

First, a woman drove her car onto a crowded sidewalk, just outside the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino. Descriptions of the event varied, but many suggested that the driver slowed the car and then hit the accelerator a second time, mowing down nearly 40 people.

At the time, the woman said that she couldn’t explain what happened, and she’d lost control of the car.

  • Per ABC News: “KSNV-TV says the crash occurred in front of the Paris Hotel & Casino and Planet Hollywood Las Vegas Resort & Casino on South Las Vegas Boulevard, north of Harmon Avenue. The crash took place about 6 p.m. The Miss Universe pageant was being held at the Planet Hollywood at the time of the crash.”

Later, news reports said she’d tested positive for marijuana, but that’s odd, as well. Per the University of Washington, “Marijuana usually has a sedating effect on most users, making it much less likely to cause violence…” Nevertheless, she described being under stress, and that can be a factor in violent behavior.

Las Vegas Anomaly #2

Meanwhile, a few hundred yards away, the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino was hosting the 2015 Miss Universe pageant.

In a baffling blunder, Steve Harvey, an experienced entertainer, crowned the wrong contestant. It’s still unclear whether he misread the card — truly odd for someone accustomed to reading from cards — or if the teleprompter script was wrong.

No matter what the explanation, Harvey crowned Miss Colombia… and then had to remove the crown and announce that Miss Philippines was the real winner.

Third Anomaly

Two nights later, Las Vegas was one of the most-reported viewing points for a bright light soaring through the night sky. Officials explained it as space debris from a Russian rocket.

That’s nothing baffling, but it is odd, since the Las Vegas sky is so well-lit by traffic and commercial signs, anything in the sky must be extraordinarily bright.

Not Quite Mandela Effect

On their own, these events are unfortunate. Combined — in time & location — they’re strange enough to note. However, the current facts in this reality don’t point to the Mandela Effect.

A few people have mentioned Columbia/Colombia spellings as possible Mandela Effect issues. Unfortunately, that mix-up is a frequent typo and spelling error. It’s difficult to attribute it to an alternate reality.

Note: I’m not saying it’s only a typo or spelling error. The problem is, very little points to the Columbia/Colombia cross-over spellings as genuine alternate memories. So, for now, it’s something to note but I’d need more data to include it in my immediate research.

It may be something we’ll look at again, later, if this kind of “typo” fits a larger pattern.

The events in Las Vegas are an interesting topic, so I’ve moved related comments here (from the New Alternate Memories page).

However, since — at this time — it has no clear Mandela Effect connections, I’m closing this to further comments.

Is it Broome Effect?

It may not be Mandela Effect, but these “coincidences” fit my Broome Theory research.

If you’d like to discuss these Las Vegas anomalies — or related patterns of strange events — comment at the Las Vegas article at BroomeTheory.com. (That’s a new website being launched in about a week. For now, the site is untidy and incomplete.)

At that site, I’m looking for anomalies that happened…

  • Same time, same location: within a block or two of these events, between 6 PM and 11 PM on 20 Dec 2016.
  • Same time, different locations: other anomalies that happened between 6 PM and 11 PM (Las Vegas time, or 2 AM GMT to 7 AM GMT).
  • Different time, but at least three consistent, headline-worthy anomalies at a specific location.

What’s Your Sign? Another Lighthearted Poll.

universe - astrologyIt’s time for another fun Saturday survey, to see if any patterns emerge among those with Mandela Effect memories.

What’s your astrological sign? Let’s focus on the popular, Western version… Aries, Pisces, and so on, at least for now.

I’m not endorsing astrology; I’m just looking, at random, for patterns. At this point, anything is possible.

[A note to skeptical critics: Yes, I do know that astrology and astronomy are two very different topics. I’ve read many scathing attacks on astrology, including the one at Deeper Minds. My approach to topics like this is different. First, I ask “does this work?” Then I question why it does, not necessarily taking commonplace explanations at face value.]

In this poll, I’m looking for two things, both from astrology: Your birth sign (from the date you were born), and your rising sign (related to the time/hour you were born).

Your birth sign is the zodiac sign where the sun was, when you were born. Those signs change about once a month.

Your rising sign is related to the sign on the horizon when you were born, and changes slightly from minute to minute.

You can look this up at Astro.com. For the rising sign, you’ll need the time of your birth; that’s usually on your birth certificate, though your mother may recall it… with more peripheral details than you ever wanted to know. (I’m a mom, so I can say that and laugh.)

Optional: I’m also interested in the sidereal time of your birth. For this, you’ll need the date — including hour & minute — of your birth, and the location, converted to latitude & longitude. Then, you’ll use any historical sidereal converter to get the time. (I repeat: This is optional.)

I’ll start this by sharing my information:

Birth sign: Virgo / Rising sign: Sagittarius.

Sidereal time of birth: 7.19.13

[Reminder: Do not share your exact birth date. For some, particularly those who have (or might in the future) share real names, this could be a privacy issue.]

I’ll expand this topic in a future survey, to include alternate astrological systems that may be even more useful. For now, I’m keeping this fairly simple.

Mirror, Mirror, and Mandela Effect Research

The topic of Snow White and “mirror, mirror” keeps resurfacing. It’s a good example of our dilemma when analyzing Mandela Effect memories.

This alternate memory relates to the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale, and later movies and TV shows.

(Important: For discussions related to potential paranormal/quantum qualities of real-life mirrors, see Alice, Mirrors, and the Mandela Effect.)

The key Snow White phrase is usually translated as “mirror, mirror” or “looking-glass, looking-glass.”

“Mirror, mirror” is what most people remember the Queen saying in the 1937 Disney movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. In fact, IMDb describes the Disney film as “by far most memorable full-length animated feature from the Disney Studios.”

One would think that “memorable” movie produced reliable, consistent memories, including the famous “Mirror, mirror” line.

However, the Queen in that movie actually said, “Magic mirror on the wall.”

Is that an example of the Mandela Effect? Possibly.

Our dilemma is rooted in the history of Snow White.

The original Brothers Grimm story

Mirror, mirror - Mandela Effect question
An illustration from page 21 of Mjallhvít (Snow White) an 1852 Icelandic translation of the Grimm-version fairytale.

The original story was called “Schneewittchen,” which translates to “Snow White.” (Schnee = Snow, and Wittchen = White.)

And, if you focus on the German, not the English translation, the Queen addresses the mirror as “Spieglein, Spieglein,” which Google translates as “Mirror, Mirror.”

That’s followed by “Wer ist die Schönste im ganzen Land?” translated as “Who is fairest of us all?”

So far, so good.

Later translation issues

However, later versions of the Snow White story translated the story as Snowdrop by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm. Here’s the most popular opening:

IT was the middle of winter, and the snowflakes were falling from the sky like feathers. Now, a Queen sat sewing at a window framed in black ebony, and as she sewed she looked out upon the snow. Suddenly she pricked her finger and three drops of blood fell on to the snow. And the red looked so lovely on the white that she thought to herself: ‘If only I had a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and as black as the wood of the window frame!’ Soon after, she had a daughter, whose hair was black as ebony, while her cheeks were red as blood, and her skin as white as snow; so she was called Snowdrop. But when the child was born the Queen died. A year after the King took another wife. She was a handsome woman, but proud and overbearing, and could not endure that any one should surpass her in beauty. She had a magic looking-glass, and when she stood before it and looked at herself she used to say:

‘Mirror, Mirror on the wall, Who is fairest of us all?’

then the Glass answered,‘Queen, thou’rt fairest of them all.’

At least the “Mirror, Mirror” phrase remained true to the Grimm version.

The same “Mirror, mirror” phrase appeared in The Red Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang, but with a different additional line:

After a year the King married again. His new wife was a beautiful woman, but so proud and overbearing that she couldn’t stand any rival to her beauty. She possessed a magic mirror, and when she used to stand before it gazing at her own reflection and ask:

     'Mirror, mirror, hanging there,
     Who in all the land's most fair?'

(Some other translations change the phrase entirely to lines such as “’Tell me, glass, tell me true!
Of all the ladies in the land, Who is fairest, tell me, who?’ I don’t think they’re relevant to this discussion, but they must be mentioned.)

So, regardless of the lines that followed, most related fairy tales seemed to say “Mirror, Mirror.”

For over 100 years — through the mid-20th century — that was the phrase people associated with Snow White.

Disney’s “Snow White” – the same or different?

Certainly, the Disney movie was adapted from the Grimm brothers’ tale.

The oft-quoted line in the movie is remembered as: “Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all?”

However, in this reality the Disney movie’s Queen has always said “Magic mirror.”

It’s easy to find “mirror, mirror” references in pop culture. Recent examples include everything from Star Trek to the 2012 movie starring Julia Roberts, and beyond.

The problem is: That phrase originated with the fairy tale published and popularized in the 19th century. We can’t draw a straight line from Star Trek (and more modern productions) to the Disney film, and leave it there. We must go back to earlier “mirror, mirror” references.

That’s the same problem we encounter with many Mandela Effect memories: Since our memories happened in another reality, I’m not sure we’ll find good, credible supporting evidence in this reality.

Like others, my memory of the Disney film is “Mirror, Mirror, on the wall…,” but that’s anecdotal. Also like others, I can’t support it with anything except others’ anecdotes.

In my opinion, that’s not only a problem; it’s stalled our research.

Evidence, anecdotes, and Mandela Effect reports

For many — perhaps most — of our alternate memories, almost all of our “evidence” is anecdotal.

Thanks to five years of reader input — and thousands of great anecdotes and theories — we can see that something is going on.

  • I don’t believe anyone is tampering with history. (Media errors, bias, and propaganda exist. They’re not part of the Mandela Effect.)
  • In fact, I believe people’s memories are more reliable than society suggests.

In my opinion, many — perhaps most — of those alternate events happened… just not in this reality.

  • We may be sliding from one reality to another.
  • We may be in a holodeck, or have “forgotten” holodeck memories.
  • And, other explanations may emerge.

I also believe that the Snow White conundrum is an example of why we now need to look for patterns. For example: we need to examine when and where “slides” may have happened. We need to study hard data points to see what emerges.

Maybe the patterns will relate to CERN activity; it’s too early to leap to that conclusion.

Several explanations will likely dominate, but I’m reluctant to insist there is just one explanation for all alternate memories.

I never guess. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. — Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of Sherlock Holmes stories.

We need more data. That’s why I’m shifting the focus of our conversations.

Let’s share specific information in comments, including dates, geographic locations, and markers.

In addition, when new alternate memories are added to our discussions, I’d like to see credible links so interested readers can research those topics, too.

Personal insights are often useful. I don’t want to eliminate them, but — in the future — they can’t continue as the main focus of this site.

As of December 2015, we have a significant database of general anecdotes — approximately 10,000 comments. They’re a great foundation for our research.

Next, let’s use them to connect the dots, or “follow the breadcrumbs,” to use a Grimm reference.

The most promising breadcrumbs seem to be dates, locations, and markers. Along with scientific theories and related historical references, they’re our new focus for the start of 2016.

Let’s see where this leads us.

Mandela Effect Geographic Survey

treasure mapThis week — once again, for fun — let’s try a different kind of survey. This time, it’s about location. I’m looking for geographic patterns.

Here’s what to do:

  1. Remember when you first realized that one of your memories didn’t match the current reality. It could be this year, last year, or even a decade ago. (This may not be where you are now. It’s where you were when you realized you weren’t “just confused” and your memory really was different.)
  2. Got one? Good. Now find its GPS coordinates. Enter the location in the Google Maps GPS Coordinates page.
  3.  So far, so good! Finally, copy the latitude & longitude from that screen, and paste it into this thread as a comment. That’s it… all you need to do.
  4. If you’ve had multiple “ah-ha!” moments like this, it’s okay to enter all of them. The more coordinates we can work with, the better.

Here’s my example: When I first realized that my odd memory of Mandela’s death in prison wasn’t unique, I was in Atlanta, GA (USA). That conversation was in the “green room” of Dragon Con, at the Hyatt in downtown Atlanta, GA, USA.

According to Google, that’s Latitude: 33.761621 | Longitude: -84.386249 <– If I were leaving a comment, that’s the only information I’d leave.

Once we’ve collected a few dozen locations, I’ll start plotting them on a map, looking for patterns. (Specifically, I’m likely to start with ley lines, in “connect the dots” style.)

SURVEY IS NOW CLOSED. We have 61 locations to work with. A map is being constructed, right now.

Numerology Survey #1 – Birth Dates

calendarLet’s have some fun. Let’s see if our birth dates point to anything odd.  And, to analyze that, I’d like to work with numerology… sort of.

(Remember, this is just for fun. It’s the weekend, and I’m in the mood for a somewhat flippant research approach. I’m not saying that I take numerology seriously, or that you should delve into it, or anything like that. I’d also like to avoid deep numerological discussions — at least until we see if any patterns emerge. )

Important: I do not want your actual birth date. Please don’t post that.

Instead, I’m looking for the single digit your birth date adds up to, condensed according to routine numerology.

Let’s say you were born 10/10/1970. You’d add the numbers, across: 1+0+1+0+1+9+7+0 = 19.

Then, you’d keep reducing the number to reach a single digit. So, working with 19, you’d figure 1+9 = 10. And 1+0 = 1.

So, your birth date — in single-digit numerology — would be a 1. That’s what you’d post in your comment: Just “My birth date is a 1.”

Master numbers

However, some forms of numerology take the numbers 11, 22, and 33 seriously. They call them “master numbers.”  (That doesn’t apply to 44, 55, etc.)

So, if something sequential in your birth date adds up to 11, 22, or 33, or it’s part of your birth date, please post that… in addition to the reduced (single digit) number.

(And yes, I am mindful that 22 could bring us back to the Sept 22/23 issue. It’s one reason I’m running this survey: in case the actual numbers are significant/markers.)

So, if you were born on 11/11/2001, that would be 1+1+1+1+2+0+0+1 = 7. You’d post the number 7 as your comment. However, you’d also mention that your birth date includes two sequential 11s; they add up to 22.

Additional information?

Mostly, I’m looking for very short comments, just sharing your birth date number. (This survey is only for those who have at least one alternate memory. If you think the Mandela Effect is fascinating — or ridiculous — and you have no alternate memories, this survey isn’t for you.)

However, it might help if you also tell us whether you have just one Mandela Effect memory, a few of them, or many alternate memories. (Please do not list them all. I’d like this thread to be easy to scroll through.)

My birth date…? It adds up to 3. (No 11s, 22s, or 33s in the process.) And I have several Mandela Effect memories.

Alice, Mirrors, and the Mandela Effect

alice through the looking glass - and the Mandela Effect

How long have people been traveling across realities? Are Mandela Effect concepts strewn throughout folklore, legends, and literature?

I believe so, and some are related to mirrors.

Mirrors as Portals in Folklore and Fiction

In Alice in Wonderland, and Through the Looking-Glass, the title character accesses an alternate reality by moving through a mirror (looking-glass) as the entry point. (Previously, she’d journeyed through a rabbit hole.)

However, author Lewis Carroll wasn’t the first (or last) to speculate about mirrors and reflective surfaces.

In folklore, water — smooth, reflective lakes and ponds, as well as the sea — has often hidden amazing realms not known in this reality. From Greek and Roman legends to Arthurian tales (the Lady of the Lake, and more), we’re reminded of alternate worlds as close as a reflection.

On the other side of the world, in the Asian art of feng shui and interior design, mirrors may “extend space” far beyond their physical depth in this reality.

In some traditions, people cover mirrors after a death in the home, so the departing spirit won’t be trapped inside the mirror.

Many haunted locations — including The Myrtles Plantation (Louisiana, USA) and the Driskill Hotel (Texas, USA) — have ghostly mirrors, as well.

  • The one in the main hallway at The Myrtles is like many of its counterparts, with recurring handprints (from the back) that returns no matter how often they clean, resurface, or even replace it. Also, a picture of me standing near that mirror — photographed by researcher Margaret Byl — showed a reflection with a chandelier that wasn’t there at the time.
  • The Driskill Hotel’s famous “Maximilian” mirrors are backed with diamond dust, not just silver or silver-colored paint. The mirrors face each other, in pairs, and many people have reported seeing alternate, similar worlds in them. (If you’re looking for ghost stories related to those mirrors, that’s the tip of the iceberg, but a discussion would take us off-topic.)

If you can stand the commercials and the silly sound effects in a video clip, “Ghost Adventures” star Zak Bagans talks about mirrors and matrixing. [Link.] It’s a good, short clip, with a skeptical slant. However, I’m not sure Zak was aware that the mirror he’s pointing at — the famous one at The Myrtles — was installed in 1980. It looks old, but it’s not from an era — usually 19th century or earlier — so common to mirrors with ghost stories.

And then there are scrying mirrors — used to see into (or contact) “the other side” or foretell the future — that have black glass, not silver. According to legend, even Nostradamus used one. So, the portal concept isn’t limited to mirrors with easy-to-see reflections.

If you like creepy mirror stories involving alternate realities, the horror movie, Mirrors, is one among many that exploit this concept.

Beyond Mirrors

Alice and the Looking-glass at Guildford Castle grounds
Photo courtesy of Jacqueline Banerjee and the Victorian Web.

My point isn’t about mirrors and whether some are portals to alternate realities. (I’m not convinced that they are, but I won’t wholly reject the concept, either.)

Instead, I’m talking about the long-held idea that an alternate reality is almost always nearby, and might be “hiding in plain sight.”

In other words, I don’t think the Mandela Effect is new. It didn’t pop up yesterday, or 10 years ago, and I certainly didn’t invent it. (Shadow and I just gave it a name with a reference to recent history.)

In fact, if you study folklore, you’ll see that many tales describe travel between realities. Some are clearer than others.

Changelings are part of a particularly dark concept from the past, in which faeries have swapped places with humans. The faerie looks (mostly) like the human he or she replaced, and the human has been sent to the world the faerie is from, as a replacement in that world or reality.

In some ancient traditions, shamans are able to access alternate realms, worlds, or realities at will. However, most contemporary tales talk about each shaman being granted passage to just one spiritual realm, not free travel across all of them.

The Rev. Mr. Robert Kirk (1644 – ?), author of “The Secret Commonwealth,” wrote about visiting an alternate reality. He described it as a faerie world, and the topic has fascinated folklorists and others, for centuries. I’ve put a question mark at his death date because many believe he left his tired body on a hillside, and actually slid back into the reality he’d been talking about for many years.

What interests me about Kirk’s story isn’t just the world he described. It’s that something in his story resonates so deeply with people, that — despite at least hundreds of similar tales — modern-day scholars still argue whether Kirk’s work was fiction or nonfiction. (And then there are the astonishing number of people who insist that the world of Avatar is real, but that’s another topic for another day.)

Then there are tales of doppelgangers, with two of the same person showing up in the same reality. According to some folklore, seeing a doppelganger predicts that one of them (usually the one whose home seems to be in that reality) will die. Is that because two of the “same” person in one reality is a glitch, and the simplest solution is to delete one? I’m not sure, but it’s worth considering.

In more recent pop culture, everything from Star Trek episodes to the entire Sliders TV series and — more recently — Sliding Doors (movie), one Eureka season and shows like Awake are among projects that use the concept of alternate realities.

Are these fictional accounts popular because, at times, we’d like to escape our current reality? Or, does the concept of alternate realms — whether actual worlds or holodeck creations — resonate with us because we know alternate realities exist… and we’ve been there?

I believe the Mandela Effect isn’t new. I think it’s been an issue for centuries, perhaps as far back as the start of recorded history, or even earlier.

However, I think past generations and cultures explained alternate realities in terms of magick, shamanic travel, or even faeries.

The idea of a mirror as a portal is just one example, but it’s one that seems to linger. Maybe there is something unusual about mirrors, and maybe some do show us another world.

Then again… maybe it’s all folklore.

What Would You Say?

helping hands
photo courtesy bas van der pluym and freeimages.com

An increasing number of apparently distraught and confused people are leaving comments. In some cases, their comments include helpful insights and data, but many comments are simply pleas for help.

In a way, this site provides support to people who’ve experienced the Mandela Effect, because they can read the comments and realize they’re not alone and they’re not “crazy” just for noticing a reality change.

That’s as much as this site can offer without wading into dangerous waters, and topics that could sidetrack our conversations.

However, I’d like to include brief, generic advice from those who’ve experienced the Mandela Effect. I’m looking for insights from those who’ve come to terms with how odd the Mandela Effect can seem, not just to the person who’s experienced it, but to those around him (or her), and the strained conversations that can result.

So, for a couple of days, I invite you to leave comments… especially those of you who’ve been visiting this site for years, and understand how difficult it can be, to stumble onto these concepts and feel overwhelmed.

Here’s what I’d like:

  • Advice to someone who isn’t sure if the Mandela Effect is real.
  • Advice to someone who’s talked about this with friends and family, and those conversations haven’t gone well.
  • Advice to someone who feels vulnerable, or like a pawn in the sliding/reality-change process.

Please keep it brief. Ideally, most will be two or three sentences or — at most — short (100 words or less) “pep talks.” Do not include lengthy personal anecdotes, or anything more than vague references to others, your medical history, etc.

Speaking of medical issues, let’s avoid off-the-cuff prescriptions like “here’s an herb/vitamin/mineral that might help calm you,” or diagnoses like “You’re not mad/crazy/mentally ill.” (Seriously, you haven’t seen the many odd comments I’ve deleted.)

This post is now closed to new comments. Thanks to all who shared their advice!

SCROLL DOWN FOR READERS’ INSIGHTS.

Lindbergh Baby – Alternate History

newspaperThis topic keeps recurring in comments, so I’m creating this post for discussions of alternate memories of the Lindbergh baby’s kidnapping.

A few guidelines:

  • Please review the facts before posting here. I won’t pretend that Wikipedia is the final word on any topic, or even reliable, but it’s a good place to start. [Link] Also see the FBI’s report.
  • Read earlier, related comments so you know about erroneous media references. (“Erroneous” in this reality, that is.) Comment threads that focused (solely) on this topic have been moved to this article.
  • Remember that, at the time and considerably later (for example, Murder on the Orient Express [1974]), fictionalized versions — print, TV, and film — altered several details. Later, some were repeated as if they were facts in the case. Be sure they weren’t your original information source.
  • Please contribute fresh, useful insights to these conversations: when, where, and a context that helps us understand why you’re sure yours is an alternate memory. (Simple “me, too” and “wow, I never knew…” comments will not be approved.)
  • If you recall a related TV show, film, book, article, or documentary that shared an alternate history (as fact/conspiracy), please link to it if you can.
  • Spell the name correctly. Otherwise, we’ll have good reason to doubt whether your fact-checking efforts were for the right person. (However, in earlier comments about the Lindbergh kidnapping, it was noted that most who recall the baby being found spell the name Lindbergh or Lindberg. Many with alternate memories, where the baby was never found, spell it Lindburg or Lindburgh.)

I believe — or at least want to believe — that the child was found and safely restored to his family, in at least one other reality.

However, the case was so sensational and has been fictionalized (with some credibility) in so many ways, this particular memory is more problematic than most. It’s not quite as difficult to untangle as the belief that Orson Welles’ “War of the Worlds” broadcast was real — and even the question about whether the panic ever happened — but it’s in the same ballpark.

Music – Alternate Memories

alternate memories - music
photo courtesy of serkan turaç and freeimages.com

With an increasing interest in alternate memories related to music, I’m creating this post to focus those comments in one location.

These threads relate to:

  • Music recordings (audio and video) that people recall, but never seemed to exist in this reality.
  • Music recordings people are certain they heard — and the recordings were popular — years before they seemed to appear in this reality.
  • Radical lyric or instrumental changes, not from parodies or covers. Note: Effective 4 Dec 2015, comments about lyric changes must include links to credible lyrics (or bands’) sites, or they cannot be approved.
  • Sound tracks from movies, but not in commercials. (The latter belong in threads focusing on the product advertised.)
  • Musicians associated with particular songs that they never recorded in this reality. (However, to me, the Cat Stevens/Harry Chapin issue looks like a blur due to misleading YouTube videos, and two recordings with similar names. So, let’s avoid that kind of topic.)
  • Musicians who died in the past, in an alternate reality, but are alive in this one… and vice versa.

Due to frequent errors by gossip-type columnists and viral (but erroneous) rumors, please fact-check before commenting here. Remember that some live recordings can be different from studio recordings, and versions issued in one country can vary from what’s released elsewhere. So, check all versions you might have heard.

Also, be sure to include the full context of your alternate memories: when, where, witnesses, and why you’re certain it’s a valid, alternate memory. (Without that information, I cannot approve music-related comments. Effective 4 Dec 2015, I’m going to be firm about that policy, as unsupported claims and argumentative comments have spiked to a ridiculous level.)