Sliders TV Series

When I talk about parallel realities and “sliders,” I often refer to the Sliders TV series.  It aired from 1995 through 2000, and was an innovator in presenting alternate history themes.

Sliders TV Series – Pilot

Here’s a preview from the movie-length pilot for the series.

Sliders TV Series

More information about the Sliders TV series, from Wikipedia:

Sliders is an American science fiction television series. It was broadcast for five seasons, beginning in 1995 and ending in 2000. The series follows a group of travelers as they use a wormhole to “slide” between different parallel universes.

Sliders TV series - castThe nature of the Sliders TV series changed throughout the seasons. The first two seasons focused on alternate histories  and social norms, with the consensus amongst the creative team maintaining these two seasons to be largely superior to what would come later on during the series’ third season.

These stories explored what would have happened, for example, if America had been conquered by the Soviet Union, if Britain had won the American War of Independence, if penicillin had not been invented, or if men were subservient to women.

(photo (c)1995, courtesy Universal Studios press kit)

The Sliders TV series was created by Robert K. Weiss and Tracy Tormé. Tormé, Weiss, Leslie Belzberg, John Landis, David Peckinpah, Bill Dial and Alan Barnette served as executive producers at different times of the production.

For its first two seasons it was produced in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Sliders was filmed primarily in Los Angeles, California, USA in the last three seasons.

The first three seasons of the Sliders TV series were aired by the Fox Network. Originally canceled after the first season, the series was renewed after a fan protest.

After Fox canceled the show again after three seasons, the series moved to The Sci-Fi Channel for its final two seasons.

The last new episode first aired on December 29, 1999 in the United Kingdom, and was broadcast on The Sci-Fi Channel on February 4, 2000.

Main cast

* Quinn Mallory (seasons 1-4), played by Jerry O’Connell
* Wade Kathleen Welles (seasons 1-3, voice of Wade in “Requiem”, S5e11), played by Sabrina Lloyd
* Rembrandt Lee “Crying Man” Brown (seasons 1-5), played by Cleavant Derricks
* Professor Maximillian P. Arturo (seasons 1-3), played by John Rhys-Davies
* Maggie Beckett (seasons 3-5), played by Kari Wührer
* Colin Mallory (season 4), played by Charlie O’Connell
* Quinn Mallory (2) a.k.a. Mallory (season 5), played by Robert Floyd
* Diana Davis (season 5), played by Tembi Locke

Recurring Guest Stars

* Colonel Angus Rickman, played by Roger Daltrey (“The Exodus” parts 1 and 2 (S3e16–17)) and Neil Dickson (episodes “The Other Slide of Darkness”, “Dinoslide”, “Stoker” and “This Slide of Paradise” (S3e21, S3e23-25))

* Elston Diggs, played by Lester Barrie (episodes “Double Cross”, “The Dream Masters”, “Desert Storm”, “Dragonslide”, “Murder Most Foul”, and “The Breeder” (S3e2, S3e5-7, S3e13, S3e19))

* Doctor Oberon Geiger, played by Peter Jurasik (episodes “The Unstuck Man”, “Applied Physics”, and “Eye of the Storm” (S5e1-2, S5e17))

For many people — including me — the Sliders TV series was an introduction to alternate history and the idea of sliding from one reality to another.

Flatland, Alternate Realities and Other Answers

alternate realitiesAlternate realities? Alternate history?

For some people, this is pure fantasy. For others, it’s scary. (I’m not sure that it should be.) For people like me, it’s an adventure.

Sure, I’ll admit that some of this makes me a little uneasy.  I’m fine with the “gooey and prickly” concepts, but if you rattle my reality more than that… well, it’s not just what’s changed. It’s wondering what else is different and I haven’t noticed it yet.

If you’re going to wander down this particular rabbit hole — and take it seriously — you’d better be prepared for some unsettling concepts.  They include alternate history and alternate realities, not as fiction but as fact.

Let’s consider the possibility that our view of reality — the one you’re taught in school — is severely limited. If we rely on our basic five senses, most people can handle the idea of two and three dimensions.

Expand it to four, five, or eleven dimensions and virtual brain freeze is likely.

Even those who work with those concepts often talk in terms of alternate realities when the fact is:  It may be reality, period. But, that’s just semantics and I’m getting ahead of myself in this discussion anyway. It’s a quirky field of study that I’ve been exploring for years.  If — at the beginning — someone had shown me what I’m writing now, I’d have said, “Okay, that person isn’t even making sense.

Before taking this discussion in interesting directions, I’d like to build a foundation.  Fortunately, people like Dr. Fred Wolf have already created entertaining ways to introduce quantum concepts.

Though that video may seem a little simplistic, it’s a fine introduction if you take these concepts to the next, logical step:  What would happen if a fourth dimension impinged on our current, three-dimensional reality?

I don’t mean “What if it’s out there, somewhere?”  I mean “What if it showed up in the basement, the next time you’re doing laundry?”  How would you interpret it?  What label would you place on it? (I’m amused that, in the video, the flatland people immediately ask if the three-dimensional interference is a ghost.)

To understand what’s going on with the Mandela Effect, it’s key to step beyond the easy answer that “it’s all fantasy.”

There is science to support the ideas of alternate history and alternate realities, and — once you get into it — it can be fascinating.

Nelson Mandela Died in Prison?

nelson mandela died in prison?Note: This was the original post that launched this website.  I’ve updated it to include more recent events.

However, if you’re new to this website, remember that this site includes many other articles related to other alternate history events that are widely remembered.  The “Major Memories” page is a good starting point.

Nelson Mandela died in prison, long before his loss on December 5th, 2013.

Many people — perhaps thousands — seem to believe that.

That’s where the title of this website, The Mandela Effect, came from.

See, I thought Nelson Mandela died in prison.  I thought I remembered it clearly, complete with news clips of his funeral, the mourning in South Africa, some rioting in cities, and the heartfelt speech by his widow.

Then, I found out he was still alive.

My reaction was sensible, “Oh, I must have misunderstood something on the news.”

I didn’t think about it again for many years, until — in the VIP suite at Dragon*Con — a member of Security (“Shadow”) casually mentioned that many people “remember” when Nelson Mandela died in prison.

That caught my attention in a hurry.

One thing led to another, and I discovered a large community of people who remember the same Mandela history that I recall.

Others have similar “false” memories.  One of the most recent and prevalent is the death of Billy Graham.  Though some claim that people are confusing that with Mr. Graham’s retirement, or perhaps the televised funeral of Mr. Graham’s wife, those who clearly remember the events disagree heartily.

However, it’s not just deaths.  People have told me about a variety of odd conflicts between their vivid memories and the world they’re currently living in.

During Dragon*Con 2010, someone insisted that he remembered a Star Trek episode that — according to one star of the show — was never filmed.  The person who remembered the alternate episode wasn’t weird or wild-eyed… he was a very normal person, and only referenced the episode as part of a routine conversation.

I was there when he heard that the episode never existed.  He was stunned, and quickly tried to find a logical explanation for his “faulty” memory.

Another quirky “false” memory involves the preview and pre-release of the sequel to the movie, Avatar.

These aren’t simple errors in memory; they seem to be fully-constructed incidents (or sequential events) from the past.  They exceed the normal range of forgetfulness.

Even stranger, other people seem to have identical memories.

This website — and my upcoming book — explore the possibilities of parallel realities, quantum science, real-life “Sliders” experiences, and alternate history.

If you believed that Nelson Mandela died in prison — long before his passing (in this timestream) on 5 December 2013 —  or you have similar memories of a “different” past, you’re not alone.