Mandela Effect – Your Personal Tipping Point

Mandela Effect - Your memories are realWhen people contact me about the Mandela Effect, their messages are usually about one of three things:

  • A new example of the Mandela Effect they’ve discovered or recently read about.
  • A question about someone else’s evidence that the Mandela Effect is real.
  • Their personal tipping point. Those emails usually include a story, and then something like “that’s when I knew it wasn’t just me.”

The latter are among the most personally rewarding. I’m delighted that the Mandela Effect confirms people’s memories. It helps them realize they’re not alone, and they’re not “crazy.”

The fact is, as much as I try to avoid conspiracy theories, apparent history can be manipulated.

But, that’s not the only explanation for the Mandela Effect. In fact, that explanation makes me break out in hives.

I prefer to believe that we’re sliding back & forth between (or perhaps through) very similar, parallel realities.

The differences may be so slight, we don’t always notice. Not until something jarring comes along, like Berenstain Bears’ book titles. Or the death of Billy Graham.

But, if you’re looking for proof of the Mandela Effect, I’m sorry but I have none.

In fact, I’m skeptical when someone shows me a photo they claim is an actual Berenstein Bears book from their granny’s attic. Or a photo of a newspaper that has a headline confirming another Mandela Effect memory. Those things can be faked.

In my opinion, social proof is probably as good as it gets, for now.  

Talk about your Mandela Effect memories. Find others who recall the same (or similar) things. When other people remember what you remember, and then add a few details you didn’t mention (perhaps on purpose), that’s when you’ll know “it’s not just you.”

Meanwhile, trust your memories. Don’t default to “I’m going crazy.” There are far too many people who’ll eagerly agree with you, and make things worse. Because: trolls and bullies.

They’re dealing with their own internal demons. Don’t let it become contagious.

The reality you’re in now… it’s where you are now. Just like traveling from one geographical area to another, where accents are different, people are still people. Your life isn’t going off the rails, even if several data points seem different where you are now.

Also, there’s no right/wrong in this. Someone who’s always remembered the children’s books as the Berenstain Bears, is simply someone who hasn’t traveled to the same realities you have.

Both of you are “right” in the context of your personal histories.

Trust your memories. No matter where they came from, and how different they are from the reality you’re in now, they’re still your memories. They’re part of who you are.

Try to look at the changes as, “Ooh, isn’t that interesting. Things are different here.” And then let it go.

But, when you meet someone with memories that match yours, I think it’s important to affirm them.

Mandela Effect t-shirtThat’s why I created another t-shirt design.

This one says “Mandela Effect – Your memories are real.”

You can download a ready-to-iron-on design here: Click here. It’s a Google Drive link. That’s a GIF you’ll print onto transfer paper. (The lettering in the GIF includes a black-letter version and a white-letter one.) The design is already backwards so it’ll iron on correctly.

Or, if you want a ready-made t-shirt, you can buy it at Amazon. Here are the links:

Mostly, I think it’s important to believe and trust your own memories. Once someone starts convincing you that your memories aren’t real… that’s a slippery slope to a very unhappy place.

Your memories are real.  When you remember something like the Berenstein Bears books –  or any of the other Mandela Effect memories that others share – and you talk about this with others, that’s when you’ll know.

It’s not “just you” and you are not alone.