Explorer or Occasional Slider?

In recent reports, more people are talking about changing memories. That is, some are starting to experience dual memories, meaning they recall two different, contrasting memories.

Others say that they vaguely recall a contrasting memory, but now it seems like it’s fading. (They’re not saying they were mistaken, previously, but a few are questioning that.)

Peeking cat, courtesy PexelsIn most cases, visitors say they suddenly recall both Berenstein and Berenstain Bears.

I’m going to take this in a speculative direction. Perhaps wild and unlikely speculation.

It’s fine if you disagree, even vehemently.

But, what if (all the best questions start that way) the longer someone is in a reality, the more their memories assimilate with the reality he or she is in?

Maybe it’s like moving to a region or country with a different accent. And, the longer you live there, the more natural it is to pronounce words the local way.

I’m reminded of a novel that seemed to suggest that reality “slides” can affect memories, eventually. (Or, it may have been how I interpreted the story.) The book was Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict. (It was an okay book, and I really enjoyed parts of it, but it wasn’t something I’d re-read.)

So, this morning, I’m wondering whether people who retain strong, alternate memories are avid explorers of realities, whether they’re consciously choosing to “slide” or not.

In other words, they’re people who visit multiple realities with greater frequency than others.

And, perhaps those who are sensing dual or even changing memories, are occasional sliders.

Or, maybe they’ve settled into this reality. They plan to stay here, and are happy to adopt its memories as their own.

Admittedly, this is speculation built on layers of “what if…?” ideas. The truth — for one person, some people, or even everyone — may be very different.

I’m just guessing, really.

For me, it’s the kind of question that makes the Mandela Effect fascinating.