That X-Files Episode

HollywoodLife.com story headline
HollywoodLife.com story headline

A recent episode of the X-Files (reboot) uses the Mandela Effect as a story element.

I’m astonished. (That’s an understatement.) I never expected the Mandela Effect to attract so much attention.

Really, this still seems kind of surreal.

I haven’t seen the X-Files episode yet, but – from descriptions, such as the one at Hollywood Life – it sounds like a great parody.

(Should I be offended by their portrayal? It sounds zany, not insulting, and really, it’s just fiction and on TV, as well. I may change my opinion after I see the episode, but – for now – I’m chuckling.)

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UPDATE

I watched the show (Season 11, Episode 4, “The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat”). I’m still chuckling. Yes, they were a little heavy handed with the political references. That was a surprise, since the show was broadcast on Fox. But, I’m aware that Fox and Fox News are independently managed.

But, putting politics firmly to one side (let’s not go there in comments), I was thoroughly pleased with the representation of the Mandela Effect. It was well-explained (well enough) and treated lightly.

To me, the shows seemed stylish and whimsical. I’m delighted. (This was the first time I’d ever watched an X-Files episode all the way through.)

I also loved the question left hanging at the end of that episode, about whether Reggie was a madman, or someone being silenced.

So, I’m pleased. For me, being the topic of an X-Files episode is about as close to a social “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” as it gets. It moves Mandela Effect discussions further into the mainstream.

The more people talk about it – and weed out what’s true, what’s not, and what’s baffling – the closer we may get to understanding this phenomenon.

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FREE T-SHIRT DESIGNS

Want to start a conversation about the Mandela Effect? A t-shirt could be useful.

These printable designs are already reversed so – as long as you have some variety of iron-on (transfer) paper – you can print the design, and then iron it onto your own t-shirts. Or whatever you like.

Here are the DIY T-shirt designs, so far (more are on the way):

1.) The Mandela Effect – What a Reality (The single-page graphic includes a white-letter version and a black-letter version. Trim the transfer to fit your needs.) Click here for the transparent GIF featuring both color choices, for personal, DIY use.Mandela Effect - what a reality!
(Trivia: That’s a design I created for my own t-shirt. It’s what I’ve worn for the past year or so. I get nods, and the occasional request to be part of a selfie.)

2.) and 3.) Instant Reality-Shift Translator – Two different iron-on designs. The first has Black letters (to print on light-colored fabric). The second has White letters (to print on black and dark-colored t-shirts).

Free Mandela Effect Iron-on(That t-shirt design does not say “Mandela Effect” on it, on purpose. It’s designed to spark conversations, but Mandela Effect fans will recognize it right away. Not quite a “secret handshake,” but not entirely obvious, either.)

4.) Mandela Effect Universe – This design is a little more difficult to use as a DIY design. (You may want to order the Amazon t-shirt, already made.)

Mandela Effect Starry Universe t-shirtThe design is entirely in shades of white and grey. Whatever color shirt you iron it onto… that will be the color of the background and the lettering. (To show the design clearly, I’ve used a black background in the illustration above.) Click here to download the transparent GIF for DIY use.

Yes, to cover the hosting bill for this website, we’d already started creating new Mandela Effect t-shirt designs, mostly for fun, but also for people who don’t want to use the DIY versions. (Some are a little too finicky for DIY designs, too. It’s better to trust the professionals with them.)

Note: Comments on this post were open through early Feb 9th. They are now closed.

Star Trek’s “Mirror, Mirror” Reality

Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the original Star Trek’s “Mirror, Mirror” episode.

By NBC Television (eBay item photo front / photo back press release) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Though many of the characters were polar opposites of their prime reality selves, some continuity made the concept credible.

Does it hold up, today? I’m not sure.

Of course, the Mandela Effect is (usually) more subtle than this, but an io9 article — Happy 50th Birthday to Star Trek’s Mirror Universe — raises a few interesting questions.

For example:

  • Most of us have noticed products, spellings, and events that don’t match our memories. But, how many people have noticed other people with radically different personalities or histories?
  • If you “slid” into an alternate reality, did your skills and personality quirks seem to surprise people who (in your prime reality) knew you well?
  • Do you think that people can change, from reality to reality? Or, is there a general continuity to how each of us behave, no matter where/when we are?

Of course, there are no clear and definitive answers on a broad scale. I’m still interested in individual answers to this.

Comments are now closed. (Don’t worry, I’ll write more articles in the future, and open each of them — briefly — to comments. Meanwhile, Reddit seems to be the best place for wider discussions.)

Personal note to a private comment: rs, you’re describing exactly what I’m talking about. This is an area that needs more research. I may explore this more deeply in 2018.

Time Travel, Per ‘Quantum Leap’

While this isn’t exactly what we’re talking about at this website, this video is useful.  It conveys a (possibly) relevant way of looking at time in a non-linear way.

Referencing different timestreams, it’s possible that — in those other realities — events in your (alternate) life are in a different sequence.

Or, as an alternate explanation of the Mandela Effect: Maybe you’re “remembering” things from the future… a future you’ve seen (in real life or dreams) due to something like Al’s time travel explanation.

Sliders TV Series

When I talk about parallel realities and “sliders,” I often refer to the Sliders TV series.  It aired from 1995 through 2000, and was an innovator in presenting alternate history themes.

Sliders TV Series – Pilot

Here’s a preview from the movie-length pilot for the series.

Sliders TV Series

More information about the Sliders TV series, from Wikipedia:

Sliders is an American science fiction television series. It was broadcast for five seasons, beginning in 1995 and ending in 2000. The series follows a group of travelers as they use a wormhole to “slide” between different parallel universes.

Sliders TV series - castThe nature of the Sliders TV series changed throughout the seasons. The first two seasons focused on alternate histories  and social norms, with the consensus amongst the creative team maintaining these two seasons to be largely superior to what would come later on during the series’ third season.

These stories explored what would have happened, for example, if America had been conquered by the Soviet Union, if Britain had won the American War of Independence, if penicillin had not been invented, or if men were subservient to women.

(photo (c)1995, courtesy Universal Studios press kit)

The Sliders TV series was created by Robert K. Weiss and Tracy Tormé. Tormé, Weiss, Leslie Belzberg, John Landis, David Peckinpah, Bill Dial and Alan Barnette served as executive producers at different times of the production.

For its first two seasons it was produced in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Sliders was filmed primarily in Los Angeles, California, USA in the last three seasons.

The first three seasons of the Sliders TV series were aired by the Fox Network. Originally canceled after the first season, the series was renewed after a fan protest.

After Fox canceled the show again after three seasons, the series moved to The Sci-Fi Channel for its final two seasons.

The last new episode first aired on December 29, 1999 in the United Kingdom, and was broadcast on The Sci-Fi Channel on February 4, 2000.

Main cast

* Quinn Mallory (seasons 1-4), played by Jerry O’Connell
* Wade Kathleen Welles (seasons 1-3, voice of Wade in “Requiem”, S5e11), played by Sabrina Lloyd
* Rembrandt Lee “Crying Man” Brown (seasons 1-5), played by Cleavant Derricks
* Professor Maximillian P. Arturo (seasons 1-3), played by John Rhys-Davies
* Maggie Beckett (seasons 3-5), played by Kari Wührer
* Colin Mallory (season 4), played by Charlie O’Connell
* Quinn Mallory (2) a.k.a. Mallory (season 5), played by Robert Floyd
* Diana Davis (season 5), played by Tembi Locke

Recurring Guest Stars

* Colonel Angus Rickman, played by Roger Daltrey (“The Exodus” parts 1 and 2 (S3e16–17)) and Neil Dickson (episodes “The Other Slide of Darkness”, “Dinoslide”, “Stoker” and “This Slide of Paradise” (S3e21, S3e23-25))

* Elston Diggs, played by Lester Barrie (episodes “Double Cross”, “The Dream Masters”, “Desert Storm”, “Dragonslide”, “Murder Most Foul”, and “The Breeder” (S3e2, S3e5-7, S3e13, S3e19))

* Doctor Oberon Geiger, played by Peter Jurasik (episodes “The Unstuck Man”, “Applied Physics”, and “Eye of the Storm” (S5e1-2, S5e17))

For many people — including me — the Sliders TV series was an introduction to alternate history and the idea of sliding from one reality to another.