Numerology Survey #1 – Birth Dates

calendarLet’s have some fun. Let’s see if our birth dates point to anything odd.  And, to analyze that, I’d like to work with numerology… sort of.

(Remember, this is just for fun. It’s the weekend, and I’m in the mood for a somewhat flippant research approach. I’m not saying that I take numerology seriously, or that you should delve into it, or anything like that. I’d also like to avoid deep numerological discussions — at least until we see if any patterns emerge. )

Important: I do not want your actual birth date. Please don’t post that.

Instead, I’m looking for the single digit your birth date adds up to, condensed according to routine numerology.

Let’s say you were born 10/10/1970. You’d add the numbers, across: 1+0+1+0+1+9+7+0 = 19.

Then, you’d keep reducing the number to reach a single digit. So, working with 19, you’d figure 1+9 = 10. And 1+0 = 1.

So, your birth date — in single-digit numerology — would be a 1. That’s what you’d post in your comment: Just “My birth date is a 1.”

Master numbers

However, some forms of numerology take the numbers 11, 22, and 33 seriously. They call them “master numbers.”  (That doesn’t apply to 44, 55, etc.)

So, if something sequential in your birth date adds up to 11, 22, or 33, or it’s part of your birth date, please post that… in addition to the reduced (single digit) number.

(And yes, I am mindful that 22 could bring us back to the Sept 22/23 issue. It’s one reason I’m running this survey: in case the actual numbers are significant/markers.)

So, if you were born on 11/11/2001, that would be 1+1+1+1+2+0+0+1 = 7. You’d post the number 7 as your comment. However, you’d also mention that your birth date includes two sequential 11s; they add up to 22.

Additional information?

Mostly, I’m looking for very short comments, just sharing your birth date number. (This survey is only for those who have at least one alternate memory. If you think the Mandela Effect is fascinating — or ridiculous — and you have no alternate memories, this survey isn’t for you.)

However, it might help if you also tell us whether you have just one Mandela Effect memory, a few of them, or many alternate memories. (Please do not list them all. I’d like this thread to be easy to scroll through.)

My birth date…? It adds up to 3. (No 11s, 22s, or 33s in the process.) And I have several Mandela Effect memories.

Tinnitus and Mandela Effect… a Connection?

ear
Ear photo courtesy Carlos Sillero and FreeImages.com

The topic of tinnitus recurs regularly in our discussions. Recently, I asked about it in my one-week survey. The numbers surprised me.

23.52% of voters (1155 people) recalled Berenstein Bears, but not Berenstain Bears.

20.81% of voters (1022 people) reported having tinnitus or ringing in the ears.

What we can’t tell from that survey is whether or not they’re the same people. My software only recorded the number of votes… nothing identifying which individuals checked which responses.

However, from related comments, it seems — only seems — as if there’s a connection.  At least some people who’ve experienced the Mandela Effect have also had tinnitus, often as a chronic issue.

Correlation, significant connection, or coincidence? I’m not sure. We have far too little evidence to decide one way or the other, but I’ll admit the speculation is fun.

Tinnitus is described as a ringing, hum, or other static-like sound in the ears. Many people perceive it as an internal issue; some are sure it’s something outside that they’re hearing due to hypersensitive hearing.

According to the Hearing Health Foundation, about 5 to 10 percent of the population experiences chronic tinnitus.

Continue reading “Tinnitus and Mandela Effect… a Connection?”