What Would You Say?

helping hands
photo courtesy bas van der pluym and freeimages.com

An increasing number of apparently distraught and confused people are leaving comments. In some cases, their comments include helpful insights and data, but many comments are simply pleas for help.

In a way, this site provides support to people who’ve experienced the Mandela Effect, because they can read the comments and realize they’re not alone and they’re not “crazy” just for noticing a reality change.

That’s as much as this site can offer without wading into dangerous waters, and topics that could sidetrack our conversations.

However, I’d like to include brief, generic advice from those who’ve experienced the Mandela Effect. I’m looking for insights from those who’ve come to terms with how odd the Mandela Effect can seem, not just to the person who’s experienced it, but to those around him (or her), and the strained conversations that can result.

So, for a couple of days, I invite you to leave comments… especially those of you who’ve been visiting this site for years, and understand how difficult it can be, to stumble onto these concepts and feel overwhelmed.

Here’s what I’d like:

  • Advice to someone who isn’t sure if the Mandela Effect is real.
  • Advice to someone who’s talked about this with friends and family, and those conversations haven’t gone well.
  • Advice to someone who feels vulnerable, or like a pawn in the sliding/reality-change process.

Please keep it brief. Ideally, most will be two or three sentences or — at most — short (100 words or less) “pep talks.” Do not include lengthy personal anecdotes, or anything more than vague references to others, your medical history, etc.

Speaking of medical issues, let’s avoid off-the-cuff prescriptions like “here’s an herb/vitamin/mineral that might help calm you,” or diagnoses like “You’re not mad/crazy/mentally ill.” (Seriously, you haven’t seen the many odd comments I’ve deleted.)

This post is now closed to new comments. Thanks to all who shared their advice!

SCROLL DOWN FOR READERS’ INSIGHTS.

Tee Shirts – ‘Old School’ Poll #1

After looking at off-site polling options, I decided to go “old school” with this. Off-site, I kept seeing sites that either required some kind of registration or they collect information about visitors in other ways.

Many MandelaEffect.com visitors are wary of that kind of thing.  So, let’s do this the old fashioned way.

From the following suggested tee shirt ideas, which are your favorites? You can list up to three. (It’s okay to refer to your favorites by number rather than typing the full phrase for each one.)

In about a week — unless there’s a clear trend from the start — I’ll add up the votes and we’ll start designing.

Note: I did not include all suggested tee shirt ideas, if I thought they might create problems. For example, a few expressions were also rude slang in some countries. And, while we use “ME” or “M.E.” as shorthand for “Mandela Effect” here, it’s been pointed out that many people might confuse that for the Middle East. And so on.

Here are the current suggestions

  1. 50 or 52?
  2. Australia: the land down over
  3. Berenst#in
  4. The Berenst#in dilemna
  5. conCERNed
  6. Cool Ranch Fritos (<– Not sure if we can use that, due to trademark issues)
  7. Definately? Definitely!
  8. Definately a dilemna
  9. Definately Schultz
  10. Reality E Reunion 2015
  11. Fix my timeline
  12. I’m from Universe E
  13. IN the City
  14. It’s always been THE neighborhood.
  15. It was 1980 something.
  16. Mirror, mirror. (Very plain text, small lettering, no graphic.)
  17. No, Luke. No, no, no.
  18. rEality
  19. September 22/23
  20. Team Multiverse
  21. Universe E
  22. Visiting from the E reality
  23. What if Mr. Stain is right?
  24. Where is New Zealand now?
  25. First line on a shirt: “Are you A vampire?” Second line in response to the first: “No, I’m THE vampire.” (maybe have stick figures or caricatures on the shirt saying the lines)
  26. [Just a single word] Chartreuse (on a dark pink shirt)
  27. Red (on a blue shirt)
  28. Blue (on a red shirt)
  29. Something representing the famous Henry VIII (with turkey leg) painting, and “I remember” beneath it.

In general, I’m aiming for shirts that seem deceptively mundane, or cryptic. None will say “Mandela Effect” on them, or have a URL.

Several people expressed an interest in shirts in darker colors with lighter lettering — black, charcoal grey, or midnight blue. Would those be your preferences, too?

Feel free to add your own suggestions — for phrases, slogans, and graphics, as well as shirt styles and colors — in comments.

Hot Air Balloon Memories – What, When, Where?

hot air balloon
FreeImage.com/Andrew Simpson

Whether or not you reported a hot air balloon memory (one that you know couldn’t really have happened) in my recent survey, if you have one of those memories, I hope you’ll share the details here.

You can post comments anonymously — with a different-than-usual username — if you like. I know this can be a sensitive topic and I’m asking for some personal details.

I’d like to see if people with the hot air balloon memory (or memories) might have had it implanted by a researcher in Elizabeth Loftus’ study, or by someone wanting to emulate her study to confirm or deny her results.

As an aside: I consider that kind of research completely unethical, appalling, and unacceptable. It’s even worse that people like Alan Alda don’t recall the memory being implanted until something triggers the truth.

Here’s what I’d like to know, if you have a hot air balloon memory that you know can’t have happened in real life. (Answer as many or few of these questions as you’re comfortable with. And, if this triggers anything unpleasant, end your comment immediately and find something pleasant to take your mind off this.)

If you have an “impossible” hot air balloon memory…

  1. When were you born? (It’s okay to say “first half of the 70s” or something vague, if you’d rather not specify a year.)
  2. Where did you live when the memory took place? (If it’s a small, rural town, also mention the nearest college town or nearest city.)
  3. Where were you when you first remembered that memory? Is there any location (geographical) where you seem to recall that memory the most clearly? (Not necessarily where it happened, or an obvious trigger location like a theme park or hot air balloon event.)
  4. When did you first clearly recall that memory? Was it always with you, or did something bring it to the forefront?
  5. What happened in the false memory? (As brief or detailed a summary as you’d like.)
  6. Was it a happy memory or an unpleasant one?

And, if you’d like to share any other thoughts that might be relevant, that’s great.

Remember: I’m not saying that your hot air balloon memory was implanted. In fact, your memory might be from a different reality, and its emotional content has kept it active among your memories in this reality.

In this conversation, I’m hoping to uncover commonalities (or that they have nothing in common) among these kinds of memories, to see what might be revealed.

One-Week Survey – Various Views [Closed]

This one-week poll checked a few topics that have been raised in recent comments. It was concluded a little early, due to software issues. The survey results are far from scientific, but might provide some insights about the Mandela Effect.

Visitors were asked to check as many answers as applied to them. For answer-by-answer notes, scroll down to below the poll.

These were the results:

One-Week-Poll-TinnitusETC

Item notes

The tinnitus (ringing or hissing in ears) answer is about a chronic or recurring sound in your ears that seems internally caused.

The hot air balloon memory seems real but unreal. You have the memory, but you’re also sure it never happened.

The September 22/23 issue is very general, but is about one of those two dates (any year), not another September date, or a 22/23 date in another month.

The “duplicate” memory answer is for people who recall two different versions of the same event, even if one seems far more real than the other.

Questions? Comments? Other answers or insights? Please share them in comments, below.

Poll: Age-related Berenstein/Berenstain Memories?

Does age make a difference in how people remember the popular Berenstein (or Berenstain) Bears books? One of our readers — Kyle — suggested that age might give us some clues to how the Mandela Effect works.

This is a two-week poll and it’s only for those who recall Berenstain, not Berenstein. (Most people who comment at this site seem to recall Berenstein, so I’m especially interested in those who recall the Berenstain spelling.)

After this poll, I’ll run a similar poll for those who recall the Berenstein spelling, to compare the results.

[yop_poll id=”6″]

Poll (closed): Have You Effected a Reality Change?

This poll (now closed) was for people who believe they have experienced a significant reality change (Mandela Effect).

Original post

Time vortex - winter whirlpoolI’m curious about your background, and whether — prior to the first time you noticed a change in your reality — you’d already been experimenting (pushing the usual boundaries) of accepted, everyday reality.

This could include:

  • Using prayer or magic to change the most likely outcome in a challenging situation.
  • Exploring past lives, reincarnation, karma, and other explanations for what’s happened in your life.
  • Other ways to facilitate (make easier) selected challenges or learning experiences in your life.
  • Attempts (successful or not) at astral travel, remote viewing, precognition, psychokinesis, etc. (Especially anything ESP-ish.)
  • Other practices (whether you believed in them or just tried them for fun) that were intended to empower you in relation to your effects on your personal reality.

You may cast your vote for more than one. Please remember that we’re looking for things you may have tried before the first time you noticed a reality shift.

[yop_poll id=”5″]

divider

If you did something else (not in the poll) that might have had an effect on your immediate or later reality, please leave a comment about it.

Remember, this isn’t about blame or — at the other extreme — boasting.

It’s about pre-slide activity, and if patterns emerge in these polls.

Poll results

649 people participated in this poll. People could choose multiple answers; they weren’t limited to just one.

It looks like about 1/3 of respondents had used mind-expanding drugs, 1/3 had used religious intercession (like prayer), and 1/3 hadn’t made any attempts to influence reality or outcomes.

Here are the actual numbers:
poll results - other influences
215 people (15.3% of votes) said they’d used mind-expanding drugs [pink section of pie chart].
213 people (15.2%) said they’d used religious intercession methods (prayer, novenas, etc.) [blue section].
164 people had experimented with astral travel [yellow].
131 people had tried magic (magick) to cause changes [purple].
113 people had tried hypnosis or something like it [light blue].
74 people had used past-life counselling or other regression techniques [red].
134 people said they’d use other, miscellaneous New Age practices [dark green].
156 people (11.1% of votes) said they’d tested other reality- or outcome-practices [light green].
202 people (14.4% of votes) checked “none of the above.”

If you have any thoughts about this concept — that a deliberate act might have predisposed you to a reality shift — I hope you’ll comment here, too.

 

Photo courtesy of primozc, Slovenia

Poll: Better or Worse? (Poll closed.)

For the next few weeks, I’ll be asking several questions. It’s time to look at general impressions of the Mandela Effect.

Roundabout sign - courtesy Colin BroughOne of the scientists curious about Mandela Effect (and how physics experiments might be affecting our timestream) raised an interesting point: If the Mandela Effect is real, do people feel as if the “slide” from one reality to another was an improvement?

I’m not sure that’s an objective question. Also, unless someone can recall a point where lots of things changed — or a single event (such as the earlier death of Nelson Mandela) seemed to make a significant difference — I’m not sure anyone can evaluate the impact of a single (and perhaps personal) reality shift.

In public and private comments, very few people describe a Mandela Effect event that changed everything.

Also, by the time anyone realizes a past event “never happened” in this timestream, I’m not sure he or she can look back and evaluate (objectively or subjectively) what else changed at that time. Generally, I think our focus remains on the single, changed event.

Nevertheless, this is a question worth asking. (One answer/vote per person.) [This poll is now closed.]

[yop_poll id=”4″]

Do you have additional thoughts about this poll? Please share them in comments.

UPDATE – Poll results

I ended the poll a few days early, since the results were clear. The following pie chart shows the top four answers.

Mandela Effect - better worse poll results

The most-voted answer was “neither better nor worse,” followed by “worse” and (light blue) “not sure,” and then “better in some ways, worse in others.”

The following bar graph shows the numbers, from fewest votes to most.

“Worse” outnumbered “better” more than three to one. That surprised me.Bar graph - Mandela Effect - better worse 2015 In this poll, 104 votes were cast in the United States. Most of the remaining 48 votes were cast in the UK and Ireland.

One deleted vote was merely a four-letter kind of insult that didn’t contribute to the discussion. Weirdly, it was cast via a “net nanny” type of server in the US, and that made me chuckle.

I’m not ready to draw any firm conclusions from this, but I welcome your comments about these results.

Roundabout photo courtesy of Colin Brough, UK

Poll: Mandela’s Death (Poll is Closed)

This is the first of several polls I’m using to find patterns in alternate memories.

If you recall Nelson Mandela’s death prior to December 2013, I hope you’ll remember (or provide a thoughtful guess about) the year — in the 1980s — you think he died.

Please vote just once, and for just one year. The default — remembering his death in 2013 — is included for those who want to register that they don’t have the alternate Mandela memory.

THIS POLL IS NOW CLOSED, BUT YOU CAN CLICK “VIEW RESULTS” IF THEY DON’T SHOW UP AUTOMATICALLY.

[yop_poll id=”3″]

Chartreuse: Red or Green? (and other colors)

Color wheel - which is chartreuse?The color chartreuse is broadly remembered as a shade of red. Some recall it as a maroon-ish red. Others describe it as a reddish magenta.

The fact is, in this timestream, the color is yellow-green. The color gets its name from the liqueur, Chartreuse.

However, I clearly recall a discussion with my mother, an artist, about the color chartreuse. I was a teen and used “chartreuse” to describe a magenta-ish dress. My mother couldn’t believe I was serious, and I remember looking in my childhood crayon box for a reddish crayon labeled “chartreuse,” but couldn’t find it.

It was a humiliating moment for me, because she was right and — in our household — that was like confusing Miro and Michelangelo. It just wasn’t done.

I didn’t think about it again until a comment about chartreuse appeared at this site. Then another did, and yet another. No matter how long I study this topic, I’m still astonished when a memory matches one of mine.

(Also, collecting comments for this article, I was amazed at how many there were. I’ve included many of them — not all — below, and apologize for the length of this article. I wanted to include enough to make it clear: This is a widespread alternate memory.)

Recent comments included the following.

In September 2014, Stephanie said:

I distinctly remember Chartreuse being a purple-pink color close to Magenta but a little darker. Less pink, more purple, but still too pink to be a true purple. I’m so confused??

In Oct 2014, Misty said:

…chartreuse was a dark red color…

Cas said:

I thought chartreuse was a rich sort of pinkish-magenta color?

I really thought chartreuse was a shade of red? Not green or yellow at all? When I clicked the Wikipedia link to see what color it is, I was so confused. I’m glad other people share in this confusion as well.
Seems like too pretty of a name for “lime green”. Ick. Doesn’t sit right with me.

I. K. said:

And yet the etymology makes perfect sense. Then again, that might be at the heart of the potential difference. So, if this Carthusian order, who’s liquor got the name associated with it, and lend itself to the name of the colour instead made a particular blend of red wine, perhaps Chartreuse would get a different colour association.

Honestly, without saying anything one way or the other on the matter, if I would have guessed without knowing, I’m certain I would have guessed it was a reddish colour. It does have the ring of a warm red drink to it.

(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carthusians)

One of the JMs (we have two) said:

Yeah the whole color changing business is a weird one.

Tee said:

I asked a friend of mine, what color she remembers Chartreuse being and she remembers it as always being the yellow/green color, but she also remembers it as being part of a series of colors spanning yellow/green to red/pink/purple, which is very interesting. I myself remember it being the red/pink/purple color only and not the yellow/green that it is now(that looks and sounds way off) nor as part of a series of colors that are in different color groupings.

Natalie said:

I’m shocked that chartreuse is now suddenly a shade of green. I always thought it was a reddy/purple colour too. I have a vague recollection of thinking that chartreuse sounded french, like a red wine, so it made sense. And now it’s green? WEIRD! The mind boggles.

Rebecca said:

I most definitely remember chartreuse as being a dark purplish pink colour. My mum laughed at me when she realised that was what I thought. I was astonished to find it’s actually a yellow-green.

I remember it as being similar to the crayon marked “scarlet red” in this image: http://www.crayoncollecting.com/ccolor29_files/image035.jpg

Could it be something to do with them being in the same collection? The similarities of the words “chartreuse” and “cerise”?

jma said:

wow…
I remember a while back (maybe 12-15 years ago? I’m pushing 40 now) I was driving my car, describing something to my friend in the passenger seat and I used the word “chartreuse” . She was surprised and we ended up getting into a debate about the definition of chartreuse. I was shocked to learn that it was the color it is now (that yellow-green-aqua color)… and had to “eat-crow”, so to speak. BUT I had forgotten the color I previously thought it was, since I’ve known the “official” definition for so long. Upon reading your post, I realize the reddish color you describe is exactly the color I used to think it was.

Becca said:

I could have sworn that chartreuse was like a magenta colour. I remember watching (and yes, i know how this sounds) blues clues, and the guy went, red and purple make chaaaaarrtruuuuuuuuuse.

dm said:

I was more than positive chartreuse was a sort of purple color until a year or two ago.

Dani said:

Chartreuse was a pink color; I’ve ALWAYS associated chartreuse with pink (sort of a pinky-orange?), and never with anything green.

Jane said:

I have always been bothered by chartreuse not being a maroon color. It is NOT yellow-green, just no, that drives me crazy every time somebody mentions it! When I was younger, I would have sworn it was deep red/purple.

Rich said:

Had to make it all the way to the bottom [of the Major Memories comment thread] for someone to finally answer the Chartreuse question. And the whole time I was waiting for some one to say a pink/ashy purple. Glad someone else has a memory of that.  the Chartreuse question. And the whole time I was waiting for some one to say a pink/ashy purple. Glad someone else has a memory of that.

Lea said:

I could have SWORN that… chartreuse was a reddish-brown color. What the heck?!

In November 2014, Emily said:

Chartreuse is a wine red, I’ve had that argument many times.

Omer said:

– I know chartreuse was a pinkish color; I was watching a Modern Marvels episode on firefighting and they were talking about how some fire trucks are starting to be painted in chartreuse instead of red because of the increased visibility. I was curious what a chartreuse firetruck would look like so I went looking for pictures online, at which point I found out that chartreuse was basically neon yellow. I distinctly remember how weird this experience was for me, especially because I had never before heard someone refer to “neon yellow” as “chartreuse”. (I was watching this sometime in 2005, so I learned about chartreuse sometime before then)

Saffie Kaplan said:

I definitely thought chartreuse was some sort of purple. I remember asking my mom about it, which was the first time I heard of it as a yellow-green.

Rachel Lynn said:

When I think of Chartreuse, for whatever reason, the first colour that popped into my head was a blue-green colour, followed closely by thinking “wait, or maybe a pink colour.” I feel more strongly that its a blue-green, but yellow-green would never have been a guess, and the more k think about it the more i swear that it was blue-green crayon and i’m tempted to go find old crayons and look.

Morgan said:

Both my mom and I remember the color Chartreuse being a pinkish-purple color, almost like a neon purple. but most definitely not a yellow-green color.

Early in 2015, Hannah Carr said:

I swear to god chartreuse was like a dark red.

Chris said:

I also remember chartreuse as being a purple-ish color

Elise said:

Chartreuse is not yellow-green. It’s an orange fiery-red. I’m a synesthete with words and music. I had huge crayon boxes because I could not spell or write if words were not in the “correct” color (I couldn’t understand why other children didn’t get confused when, for instance, teachers wrote in colored chalk on the chalk board but wrote complete sentences in 1 color!). Luckily my gifted teacher researched my instances and realized it as synesthesia. She encouraged me to color code (which is the fist time I really understood math) and it allowed me to learn different languages at a young age (words which have the same meaning in another language represent in the same color – unlike music which seems to represent based on tonal sound).
All this to say that the word “aerospace” is a chartreuse word. In German the word “Raumfahrt” is also a chartreuse word. Both are a fiery orange-red.

Another Rachel said:

I used to think chartreuse was a dark red or burgundy color.

Cameron said:

Oh dear lord, i’m not alone. My whole life i thought Chartruese was a deep red or purple. I considered it my favorite color for a long time. It wasn’t until my sophmore year in highschool that i found out it was a light yellow or green. My best friend was ordering her dress and wanted my opinion. She said that she was getting it in Chartruse and i told her that was the one I thought would look nice, but the only picture she has was this gross pukey yellow and i said, “i’m glad you’re getting a different color than in the picture, because that is an awful color”. She then corrected me that the one pictured was the Chartrues one. I guess, all along the color i thought i loved was actually Mauve?

Donna said:

Yes chartreuse was a maroon-red color. It was only a couple years ago that I saw a crayon marked chartreuse and it was this awful green-yellow color, and I thought that Crayola must have made a mistake!

If you’d like to add a comment, you can use the numbers on the following color wheel to indicate the color you recall as chartreuse.

Color wheel
Color wheel courtesy of Sylveno at Wikimedia Commons.

 

Brian Williams’ Memories – False or Mandela Effect?

Brian Williams
Brian Williams – photo courtesy of David Shankbone.

Brian Williams’ “false” reports could be important to Mandela Effect discussions.  This is a high-profile case of someone who seems to remember an incident clearly — and have some supporting testimony — but, in this reality, the actual event was slightly different.

In the bigger picture — whether Williams’ helicopter was shot down, or one close to him was — isn’t especially noteworthy. History won’t note this with alacrity. Williams’ experience — as he recounted it — is representative of others’, if not his own.

However, in Mandela Effect terms, it’s interesting that Williams’ report was — and still is — echoed by the helicopter pilot, Rich Krell.

Sure, it’s possible both were mistaken. For Williams, the experience was terrifying. For the pilot, it may have been something he confused with a different time he was shot down. But… maybe neither are confused.

This question was brought to my attention by one of this site’s regular readers and contributors, NDE Survivor. Here’s the initial comment:

For your consideration (borrowing a phrase from The Twilight Zone)….

Brian Williams. Generally, I think news anchors are egotistic narcissists. But, this whole thing feels off to me. From 2003 to 2012? His recollection of his helicopter experience seems fairly consistent. Now, his recollection differs. What really got me thinking about this is when he said this in his apology:

“I spent much of the weekend thinking I’d gone crazy,” Williams wrote. “I feel terrible about making this mistake, especially since I found my OWN WRITING about the incident from back in ’08, and I was indeed on the Chinook behind the bird that took the RPG in the tail housing just above the ramp.”; and “I would not have chosen to make this mistake,” Williams told the newspaper. “I don’t know what screwed up in my mind that caused me to conflate one aircraft with another.”

It reminded me of the Berenstein-ers searching through their attics only to discover that their childhood books now say Berenstain.

And today, the pilot of helicopter, who originally concurred with Williams’ recollections of their helicopter coming under fire, said this: “…the information I gave you was true based on my memories, but at this point I am questioning my memories.”

So Williams and the pilot are now questioning their memories. Other soldiers clearly have a different set of memories. In light of the phenomenon discussed here, I am willing to extend credulity. I think this could be more complicated than what is being portrayed in the media.

Here’s my reply:

I agree, 100%. Brian Williams is a terrible liar. When he’s delivering a story he doesn’t fully agree with (or perhaps doesn’t fully believe), you can read it all over his face. That’s one reason I like him as a newscaster. When he told his helicopter story, I saw zero “tells” to indicate a shaky, embellished, or false story. He said it with certainty. I’m sure he believed it.

His emotions were in high gear when he made his apology, so his expressions are hard to read. He’s not quite himself there — obviously chagrined and unsettled — so I can’t tell what’s going on. (I’m a big fan of Paul Ekman — the real-life “Lie to Me” guy — and have done some of his courses.)

Also, Brian Williams’ “credibility” is getting far too much media attention, and I’m trying to understand why. Maybe it’s just the nature of news. Maybe his competitors are doing their best to oust him.

My family and I watched several interviews on Newsy and other curated news feeds, in which Williams talked about either the helicopter incident or his NOLA/Katrina experiences.

(The latter is no big deal. Having dealt with high-level media in reference to the French Quarter: So far, 100% of the media I’ve talked with, outside Louisiana, don’t understand where the French Quarter ends. Several high-end hotels aren’t in the Quarter; they’re on on the edge of it. TV producers booking hotels have seemed utterly oblivious to that important difference. Obviously, Brian Williams didn’t know, either, and I’m fine with that… or maybe the Ritz in his then-reality was in the French Quarter. It’s hard to tell.)

Seeing a body float down the street in America was far beyond anything Williams ever expected to see. And, Williams believed what he’d said about the helicopter incident, which I’m sure was terrifying at the time.

Were these “Mandela Effect moments”? Maybe. For me, it’s just as easy to believe that the trauma of those incidents was so severe, he’s blocked most memories of them.

My family also wondered (in true tin-foil hat mode)  if Williams has been working on a news story — his own project — and someone higher up the food chain isn’t happy with it, so some pre-emptive discrediting is in progress.

I’ll be watching Williams closely to see what happens next. For now, I don’t doubt his credibility for a second. His stories weren’t 100% accurate in this reality, but I’m sure he was telling each story exactly as he remembered it.

His reports raise an interesting question: Is there a correlation between “sliding” and traumatic or highly emotional experiences? That is, during (or immediately after) an event that we’d like to flee from, do we unconsciously slide to a different reality, hoping it will be better?

And, having slid like that, once, are we more likely to do so in the future, not necessarily fleeing trauma, but out of sheer curiosity?

What makes the Williams story so interesting is that Williams isn’t the only one with an alternate (and fairly credible) memory of the helicopter incident, and they both remember it the same way.

In Mandela Effect terms, that’s pure gold.