Poll (closed): Have You Effected a Reality Change?

This poll (now closed) was for people who believe they have experienced a significant reality change (Mandela Effect).

Original post

Time vortex - winter whirlpoolI’m curious about your background, and whether — prior to the first time you noticed a change in your reality — you’d already been experimenting (pushing the usual boundaries) of accepted, everyday reality.

This could include:

  • Using prayer or magic to change the most likely outcome in a challenging situation.
  • Exploring past lives, reincarnation, karma, and other explanations for what’s happened in your life.
  • Other ways to facilitate (make easier) selected challenges or learning experiences in your life.
  • Attempts (successful or not) at astral travel, remote viewing, precognition, psychokinesis, etc. (Especially anything ESP-ish.)
  • Other practices (whether you believed in them or just tried them for fun) that were intended to empower you in relation to your effects on your personal reality.

You may cast your vote for more than one. Please remember that we’re looking for things you may have tried before the first time you noticed a reality shift.

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If you did something else (not in the poll) that might have had an effect on your immediate or later reality, please leave a comment about it.

Remember, this isn’t about blame or — at the other extreme — boasting.

It’s about pre-slide activity, and if patterns emerge in these polls.

Poll results

649 people participated in this poll. People could choose multiple answers; they weren’t limited to just one.

It looks like about 1/3 of respondents had used mind-expanding drugs, 1/3 had used religious intercession (like prayer), and 1/3 hadn’t made any attempts to influence reality or outcomes.

Here are the actual numbers:
poll results - other influences
215 people (15.3% of votes) said they’d used mind-expanding drugs [pink section of pie chart].
213 people (15.2%) said they’d used religious intercession methods (prayer, novenas, etc.) [blue section].
164 people had experimented with astral travel [yellow].
131 people had tried magic (magick) to cause changes [purple].
113 people had tried hypnosis or something like it [light blue].
74 people had used past-life counselling or other regression techniques [red].
134 people said they’d use other, miscellaneous New Age practices [dark green].
156 people (11.1% of votes) said they’d tested other reality- or outcome-practices [light green].
202 people (14.4% of votes) checked “none of the above.”

If you have any thoughts about this concept — that a deliberate act might have predisposed you to a reality shift — I hope you’ll comment here, too.

 

Photo courtesy of primozc, Slovenia

Poll: Better or Worse? (Poll closed.)

For the next few weeks, I’ll be asking several questions. It’s time to look at general impressions of the Mandela Effect.

Roundabout sign - courtesy Colin BroughOne of the scientists curious about Mandela Effect (and how physics experiments might be affecting our timestream) raised an interesting point: If the Mandela Effect is real, do people feel as if the “slide” from one reality to another was an improvement?

I’m not sure that’s an objective question. Also, unless someone can recall a point where lots of things changed — or a single event (such as the earlier death of Nelson Mandela) seemed to make a significant difference — I’m not sure anyone can evaluate the impact of a single (and perhaps personal) reality shift.

In public and private comments, very few people describe a Mandela Effect event that changed everything.

Also, by the time anyone realizes a past event “never happened” in this timestream, I’m not sure he or she can look back and evaluate (objectively or subjectively) what else changed at that time. Generally, I think our focus remains on the single, changed event.

Nevertheless, this is a question worth asking. (One answer/vote per person.) [This poll is now closed.]

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Do you have additional thoughts about this poll? Please share them in comments.

UPDATE – Poll results

I ended the poll a few days early, since the results were clear. The following pie chart shows the top four answers.

Mandela Effect - better worse poll results

The most-voted answer was “neither better nor worse,” followed by “worse” and (light blue) “not sure,” and then “better in some ways, worse in others.”

The following bar graph shows the numbers, from fewest votes to most.

“Worse” outnumbered “better” more than three to one. That surprised me.Bar graph - Mandela Effect - better worse 2015 In this poll, 104 votes were cast in the United States. Most of the remaining 48 votes were cast in the UK and Ireland.

One deleted vote was merely a four-letter kind of insult that didn’t contribute to the discussion. Weirdly, it was cast via a “net nanny” type of server in the US, and that made me chuckle.

I’m not ready to draw any firm conclusions from this, but I welcome your comments about these results.

Roundabout photo courtesy of Colin Brough, UK

Poll: Mandela’s Death (Poll is Closed)

This is the first of several polls I’m using to find patterns in alternate memories.

If you recall Nelson Mandela’s death prior to December 2013, I hope you’ll remember (or provide a thoughtful guess about) the year — in the 1980s — you think he died.

Please vote just once, and for just one year. The default — remembering his death in 2013 — is included for those who want to register that they don’t have the alternate Mandela memory.

THIS POLL IS NOW CLOSED, BUT YOU CAN CLICK “VIEW RESULTS” IF THEY DON’T SHOW UP AUTOMATICALLY.

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Chartreuse: Red or Green? (and other colors)

Color wheel - which is chartreuse?The color chartreuse is broadly remembered as a shade of red. Some recall it as a maroon-ish red. Others describe it as a reddish magenta.

The fact is, in this timestream, the color is yellow-green. The color gets its name from the liqueur, Chartreuse.

However, I clearly recall a discussion with my mother, an artist, about the color chartreuse. I was a teen and used “chartreuse” to describe a magenta-ish dress. My mother couldn’t believe I was serious, and I remember looking in my childhood crayon box for a reddish crayon labeled “chartreuse,” but couldn’t find it.

It was a humiliating moment for me, because she was right and — in our household — that was like confusing Miro and Michelangelo. It just wasn’t done.

I didn’t think about it again until a comment about chartreuse appeared at this site. Then another did, and yet another. No matter how long I study this topic, I’m still astonished when a memory matches one of mine.

(Also, collecting comments for this article, I was amazed at how many there were. I’ve included many of them — not all — below, and apologize for the length of this article. I wanted to include enough to make it clear: This is a widespread alternate memory.)

Recent comments included the following.

In September 2014, Stephanie said:

I distinctly remember Chartreuse being a purple-pink color close to Magenta but a little darker. Less pink, more purple, but still too pink to be a true purple. I’m so confused??

In Oct 2014, Misty said:

…chartreuse was a dark red color…

Cas said:

I thought chartreuse was a rich sort of pinkish-magenta color?

I really thought chartreuse was a shade of red? Not green or yellow at all? When I clicked the Wikipedia link to see what color it is, I was so confused. I’m glad other people share in this confusion as well.
Seems like too pretty of a name for “lime green”. Ick. Doesn’t sit right with me.

I. K. said:

And yet the etymology makes perfect sense. Then again, that might be at the heart of the potential difference. So, if this Carthusian order, who’s liquor got the name associated with it, and lend itself to the name of the colour instead made a particular blend of red wine, perhaps Chartreuse would get a different colour association.

Honestly, without saying anything one way or the other on the matter, if I would have guessed without knowing, I’m certain I would have guessed it was a reddish colour. It does have the ring of a warm red drink to it.

(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carthusians)

One of the JMs (we have two) said:

Yeah the whole color changing business is a weird one.

Tee said:

I asked a friend of mine, what color she remembers Chartreuse being and she remembers it as always being the yellow/green color, but she also remembers it as being part of a series of colors spanning yellow/green to red/pink/purple, which is very interesting. I myself remember it being the red/pink/purple color only and not the yellow/green that it is now(that looks and sounds way off) nor as part of a series of colors that are in different color groupings.

Natalie said:

I’m shocked that chartreuse is now suddenly a shade of green. I always thought it was a reddy/purple colour too. I have a vague recollection of thinking that chartreuse sounded french, like a red wine, so it made sense. And now it’s green? WEIRD! The mind boggles.

Rebecca said:

I most definitely remember chartreuse as being a dark purplish pink colour. My mum laughed at me when she realised that was what I thought. I was astonished to find it’s actually a yellow-green.

I remember it as being similar to the crayon marked “scarlet red” in this image: http://www.crayoncollecting.com/ccolor29_files/image035.jpg

Could it be something to do with them being in the same collection? The similarities of the words “chartreuse” and “cerise”?

jma said:

wow…
I remember a while back (maybe 12-15 years ago? I’m pushing 40 now) I was driving my car, describing something to my friend in the passenger seat and I used the word “chartreuse” . She was surprised and we ended up getting into a debate about the definition of chartreuse. I was shocked to learn that it was the color it is now (that yellow-green-aqua color)… and had to “eat-crow”, so to speak. BUT I had forgotten the color I previously thought it was, since I’ve known the “official” definition for so long. Upon reading your post, I realize the reddish color you describe is exactly the color I used to think it was.

Becca said:

I could have sworn that chartreuse was like a magenta colour. I remember watching (and yes, i know how this sounds) blues clues, and the guy went, red and purple make chaaaaarrtruuuuuuuuuse.

dm said:

I was more than positive chartreuse was a sort of purple color until a year or two ago.

Dani said:

Chartreuse was a pink color; I’ve ALWAYS associated chartreuse with pink (sort of a pinky-orange?), and never with anything green.

Jane said:

I have always been bothered by chartreuse not being a maroon color. It is NOT yellow-green, just no, that drives me crazy every time somebody mentions it! When I was younger, I would have sworn it was deep red/purple.

Rich said:

Had to make it all the way to the bottom [of the Major Memories comment thread] for someone to finally answer the Chartreuse question. And the whole time I was waiting for some one to say a pink/ashy purple. Glad someone else has a memory of that.  the Chartreuse question. And the whole time I was waiting for some one to say a pink/ashy purple. Glad someone else has a memory of that.

Lea said:

I could have SWORN that… chartreuse was a reddish-brown color. What the heck?!

In November 2014, Emily said:

Chartreuse is a wine red, I’ve had that argument many times.

Omer said:

– I know chartreuse was a pinkish color; I was watching a Modern Marvels episode on firefighting and they were talking about how some fire trucks are starting to be painted in chartreuse instead of red because of the increased visibility. I was curious what a chartreuse firetruck would look like so I went looking for pictures online, at which point I found out that chartreuse was basically neon yellow. I distinctly remember how weird this experience was for me, especially because I had never before heard someone refer to “neon yellow” as “chartreuse”. (I was watching this sometime in 2005, so I learned about chartreuse sometime before then)

Saffie Kaplan said:

I definitely thought chartreuse was some sort of purple. I remember asking my mom about it, which was the first time I heard of it as a yellow-green.

Rachel Lynn said:

When I think of Chartreuse, for whatever reason, the first colour that popped into my head was a blue-green colour, followed closely by thinking “wait, or maybe a pink colour.” I feel more strongly that its a blue-green, but yellow-green would never have been a guess, and the more k think about it the more i swear that it was blue-green crayon and i’m tempted to go find old crayons and look.

Morgan said:

Both my mom and I remember the color Chartreuse being a pinkish-purple color, almost like a neon purple. but most definitely not a yellow-green color.

Early in 2015, Hannah Carr said:

I swear to god chartreuse was like a dark red.

Chris said:

I also remember chartreuse as being a purple-ish color

Elise said:

Chartreuse is not yellow-green. It’s an orange fiery-red. I’m a synesthete with words and music. I had huge crayon boxes because I could not spell or write if words were not in the “correct” color (I couldn’t understand why other children didn’t get confused when, for instance, teachers wrote in colored chalk on the chalk board but wrote complete sentences in 1 color!). Luckily my gifted teacher researched my instances and realized it as synesthesia. She encouraged me to color code (which is the fist time I really understood math) and it allowed me to learn different languages at a young age (words which have the same meaning in another language represent in the same color – unlike music which seems to represent based on tonal sound).
All this to say that the word “aerospace” is a chartreuse word. In German the word “Raumfahrt” is also a chartreuse word. Both are a fiery orange-red.

Another Rachel said:

I used to think chartreuse was a dark red or burgundy color.

Cameron said:

Oh dear lord, i’m not alone. My whole life i thought Chartruese was a deep red or purple. I considered it my favorite color for a long time. It wasn’t until my sophmore year in highschool that i found out it was a light yellow or green. My best friend was ordering her dress and wanted my opinion. She said that she was getting it in Chartruse and i told her that was the one I thought would look nice, but the only picture she has was this gross pukey yellow and i said, “i’m glad you’re getting a different color than in the picture, because that is an awful color”. She then corrected me that the one pictured was the Chartrues one. I guess, all along the color i thought i loved was actually Mauve?

Donna said:

Yes chartreuse was a maroon-red color. It was only a couple years ago that I saw a crayon marked chartreuse and it was this awful green-yellow color, and I thought that Crayola must have made a mistake!

If you’d like to add a comment, you can use the numbers on the following color wheel to indicate the color you recall as chartreuse.

Color wheel
Color wheel courtesy of Sylveno at Wikimedia Commons.

 

Brian Williams’ Memories – False or Mandela Effect?

Brian Williams
Brian Williams – photo courtesy of David Shankbone.

Brian Williams’ “false” reports could be important to Mandela Effect discussions.  This is a high-profile case of someone who seems to remember an incident clearly — and have some supporting testimony — but, in this reality, the actual event was slightly different.

In the bigger picture — whether Williams’ helicopter was shot down, or one close to him was — isn’t especially noteworthy. History won’t note this with alacrity. Williams’ experience — as he recounted it — is representative of others’, if not his own.

However, in Mandela Effect terms, it’s interesting that Williams’ report was — and still is — echoed by the helicopter pilot, Rich Krell.

Sure, it’s possible both were mistaken. For Williams, the experience was terrifying. For the pilot, it may have been something he confused with a different time he was shot down. But… maybe neither are confused.

This question was brought to my attention by one of this site’s regular readers and contributors, NDE Survivor. Here’s the initial comment:

For your consideration (borrowing a phrase from The Twilight Zone)….

Brian Williams. Generally, I think news anchors are egotistic narcissists. But, this whole thing feels off to me. From 2003 to 2012? His recollection of his helicopter experience seems fairly consistent. Now, his recollection differs. What really got me thinking about this is when he said this in his apology:

“I spent much of the weekend thinking I’d gone crazy,” Williams wrote. “I feel terrible about making this mistake, especially since I found my OWN WRITING about the incident from back in ’08, and I was indeed on the Chinook behind the bird that took the RPG in the tail housing just above the ramp.”; and “I would not have chosen to make this mistake,” Williams told the newspaper. “I don’t know what screwed up in my mind that caused me to conflate one aircraft with another.”

It reminded me of the Berenstein-ers searching through their attics only to discover that their childhood books now say Berenstain.

And today, the pilot of helicopter, who originally concurred with Williams’ recollections of their helicopter coming under fire, said this: “…the information I gave you was true based on my memories, but at this point I am questioning my memories.”

So Williams and the pilot are now questioning their memories. Other soldiers clearly have a different set of memories. In light of the phenomenon discussed here, I am willing to extend credulity. I think this could be more complicated than what is being portrayed in the media.

Here’s my reply:

I agree, 100%. Brian Williams is a terrible liar. When he’s delivering a story he doesn’t fully agree with (or perhaps doesn’t fully believe), you can read it all over his face. That’s one reason I like him as a newscaster. When he told his helicopter story, I saw zero “tells” to indicate a shaky, embellished, or false story. He said it with certainty. I’m sure he believed it.

His emotions were in high gear when he made his apology, so his expressions are hard to read. He’s not quite himself there — obviously chagrined and unsettled — so I can’t tell what’s going on. (I’m a big fan of Paul Ekman — the real-life “Lie to Me” guy — and have done some of his courses.)

Also, Brian Williams’ “credibility” is getting far too much media attention, and I’m trying to understand why. Maybe it’s just the nature of news. Maybe his competitors are doing their best to oust him.

My family and I watched several interviews on Newsy and other curated news feeds, in which Williams talked about either the helicopter incident or his NOLA/Katrina experiences.

(The latter is no big deal. Having dealt with high-level media in reference to the French Quarter: So far, 100% of the media I’ve talked with, outside Louisiana, don’t understand where the French Quarter ends. Several high-end hotels aren’t in the Quarter; they’re on on the edge of it. TV producers booking hotels have seemed utterly oblivious to that important difference. Obviously, Brian Williams didn’t know, either, and I’m fine with that… or maybe the Ritz in his then-reality was in the French Quarter. It’s hard to tell.)

Seeing a body float down the street in America was far beyond anything Williams ever expected to see. And, Williams believed what he’d said about the helicopter incident, which I’m sure was terrifying at the time.

Were these “Mandela Effect moments”? Maybe. For me, it’s just as easy to believe that the trauma of those incidents was so severe, he’s blocked most memories of them.

My family also wondered (in true tin-foil hat mode)  if Williams has been working on a news story — his own project — and someone higher up the food chain isn’t happy with it, so some pre-emptive discrediting is in progress.

I’ll be watching Williams closely to see what happens next. For now, I don’t doubt his credibility for a second. His stories weren’t 100% accurate in this reality, but I’m sure he was telling each story exactly as he remembered it.

His reports raise an interesting question: Is there a correlation between “sliding” and traumatic or highly emotional experiences? That is, during (or immediately after) an event that we’d like to flee from, do we unconsciously slide to a different reality, hoping it will be better?

And, having slid like that, once, are we more likely to do so in the future, not necessarily fleeing trauma, but out of sheer curiosity?

What makes the Williams story so interesting is that Williams isn’t the only one with an alternate (and fairly credible) memory of the helicopter incident, and they both remember it the same way.

In Mandela Effect terms, that’s pure gold.

Many Interacting Worlds (MIW)

mannequin reflectedSince I first began studying the Mandela Effect, I’ve believed it was real and it would tie into quantum studies in some way.  (I’ve believed that interacting worlds — or realities or timestreams — explain many “hauntings” and other paranormal phenomena, as well. This hasn’t made me very popular in some ghost hunting circles.)

Now, scientists are explaining the basic concept far better than I could, and they’re calling it “many interacting worlds” or MIW. (Huge thanks to a Mandela Effect visitor, Brian, for bringing the newest articles to my attention.)

If you’ve thought that the Mandela Effect makes sense — and especially if you have memories of slightly different, alternate moments in history — you may find relief in the more scientific explanations:

Parallel worlds exist and interact with our world, say physicists

Here’s a quote from Many Interacting Worlds theory: Scientists propose existence and interaction of parallel worlds

Professor Wiseman and his colleagues propose that:

  • The universe we experience is just one of a gigantic number of worlds. Some are almost identical to ours while most are very different;
  • All of these worlds are equally real, exist continuously through time, and possess precisely defined properties;
  • All quantum phenomena arise from a universal force of repulsion between ‘nearby’ (i.e. similar) worlds which tends to make them more dissimilar.

From Ghost universes kill Schrödinger’s quantum cat:

Our universe, they claim, shares space with a large number of other universes, each of which follows the classical, Newtonian laws of physics… “One way to think about it is that they coexist in the same space as our universe, like ghost universes,” Wiseman says. These other worlds are mostly invisible because they only interact with ours under very strict conditions, and only in very minute ways, he says, via a force acting between similar particles in different universes.

More links:

New quantum mechanics theory says parallel universes exist, interact

‘Quantum Weirdness’ and ‘Many Interacting Worlds’ explained by Bill Poirier, the creator of the theory. Also see his commentary in an editorial at Physical Review X.

And, for those who want to get into the nuts & bolts of this, Quantum Phenomena Modeled by Interactions between Many Classical Worlds

I’m not convinced this is the final or complete answer to our questions about Mandela Effect and other “weird” phenomena, but it’s a great step in the right direction.

First Poll – Major Memories

checkbox-greenPOLL CLOSED

It’s time to see how many people remember which memories. The first goal is to see if most people have all, some, or only a few of the most-reported alternate memories.

Also, this was only the first poll of many. Future polls will look for other patterns among alternate memories and those who recall them. Continue reading “First Poll – Major Memories”