Berenstein or Berenstain Bears?

By | 25 June 14

berenstainberensteinbearsMany people who visit the Mandela Effect website have fond memories of the Berenstein Bears books. They read them as children, or family members read them aloud. It’s a cherished childhood memory.

However, the books in this timestream are Berenstain Bears. A, not E, in last syllable.

That’s not what most visitors seem to remember. The following are among the many memories people have shared, sometimes as part of longer comments.  The vast majority recall the books as Berenstein Bears.

In March 2014, JM said:

I too clearly remember it as ‘Berenstein’ even though I never read the books. Why would anyone change that? Seems irrelevant.

Jennifer Shepherd said:

I had overlooked the material here about people remembering the popular children’s books as being Berenstein Bears, not Berenstain Bears; I just saw that today and it blew my mind! I was a meticulous spelling nerd as a child and have ZERO doubt that the books the kids were reading were about the Berenstein Bears. I tried to research Library of Congress and trademark info today, to see if maybe there had at some point been a changeover due to multiple parties using variations of the name. Nope, the official records state that the series was always Berenstain, after the very real last names of the authors (Berenstain.)

In April 2014, Tee said:

I notice changes everyday. For one I saw the Berenstein/Berenstain Bears thing mentioned and I always knew them is Berenstein.

Nat replied:

Berenstain Bears?! I could’ve sworn it was spelt Berenstein too. Wow, how peculiar…

In May 2014, Heathyr said:

…We both remember berestein bears rather than berenstain,

In June 2014, Louis asked:

Does anyone remember the Berenstein Bears? I do. Although somewhere along the line the name has changed to the Berenstain Bears. No record of “stein” which is definitely how it was when i was younger. No question about it.

Matt said:

I specifically remember Berenstein Bears, not Berenstain Bears. My wife didn’t remember, but I did, I liked them a lot.

Mary Garcia said:

…it was always Berenstein and now it is Berenstain. My 20 year old daughter, who had ever Bear book was just as creeped out when I showed her this, she said “no Mom it was always Berenstein”. I joked that at least we came from the same reality together, so I took great comfort in that.

Sandi said:

It was always Berenstein bears for me. I was a voracious reader as a child and pronounced it as either “stine” or “steen” I eventually settled with “steen”. Now if it had been spelled “stain” there would have been no question of my pronunciation of that. I noticed this difference about 5 years ago and chalked it up to new editions being re-labelled. Now it seems it was NEVER called that to begin with.

Stephen Comer said:

I would like to say that I VERY CLEARLY remember “Berenstain Bears” being Berenstein Bears. I very specifically remember it being pronounced “STEIN” on the show.

aldooze said:

Another one worth mentioning is the children s books about the ‘Berenstain Bears’ . Every single person I have talked to swears it was spelled ‘Berenstein Bears” .

LadyJEM5 said:

While my children were small my mother & I purchased the entire Berenstein Bears library collection. At no time have I ever known them to be anything other than that, however I will confirm this for my own peace of mind by digging them out of storage.

John said:

Absolutely 100%. Berenstein/stain had me spooked

KingKen6669 said:

I, too, remember pronouncing Berenstain – “Burn-steen” my entire life. The books were a big part of my childhood; my grandmother read them to me until I was much too old, and i enjoyed every second of it. I was quite surprised when I saw the thread and the claim – it’s a hard thing to swallow. My first thought, naturally, was “i’m misremembering” – that wasn’t enough, I tried to make some sense of it in my post here.

When did this Berenstein vs Berenstain debate begin? I can remember an event less than 5 years ago – I was referencing them in a text message to a friend, and do remember looking up the correct spelling on my phone – I remember it clearly being STEIN. However, part of me feels that i’m buying into the “crazy”, and the other part of me trusts that i’m not mis-remembering.

Mina said:

I also KNOW without a shadow of a doubt, that the childrens books were the “Berenstein” Bears, not the “Berenstain” Bears. I am a readaholic, and have been since I was 4 years old. I read every single word, just as I have done with these comments! ALL the time, I was reading BERENSTEIN, and our next-door neighbor was Mr. Steinman (pronounced “STINE”) so I asked my grandmother if it was pronounced Beren-STINE or Beren-STEEN. She said it was pronounced “Bern-Steen” Bears, different than Mr. Steinman’s name… I would never have asked her how to pronounce it, if it had been spelled “Berenstain”!

Brian said:

Other things I remember are Berenstein…

However, like most of these memories, readers aren’t in lockstep, universal agreement.

In March 2014, Steph said:

I very vividly remember The Berenstein Bears being called The Berenstain Bears.

In June 2014, DG said:

As clearly as my memory’s of Billy Graham’s death are, I still remember them as the BerenSTAIN Bears.

So, what do you remember, Berenstein or Berenstain? Leave  your comments below. Thanks!

 

50 thoughts on “Berenstein or Berenstain Bears?

  1. Brandon

    I absolutely remember them being the Berenstein bears. BerenSTAIN bears sounds stupid and I also would have been making jokes about “stained” bears at that age.

    Reply
  2. Mel

    Yep, my husband and I remember the Berenstein Bears and the weird thing is we pronounce it differently. My mom used to read me these books (never saw the tv show) and she pronounced it steen, she would’ve read it as stain had it been so. My husband also read the books (he’s a little older) and distinctly remembers pronouncing it stine. This is bugging me constantly, but I will not let a dimension slip or whatever it may be alter my memories! It may alter the physical, but not the emotional/spiritual side of people, so this may happen more and more frequently. (It may be time to start keeping a journal again…).

    Reply
  3. Julia

    Fiona – have you seen the blog – “Wood Between Worlds” regarding “Berenstein Bears – We are Living in Our Own Parallel Universe.” (I’m sorry I can’t think how to link it.) Stan and Jan Berenstain’s son Mike even writes a comment about this. Of course to him, the books were always Berenstain, just like the family name. How very odd it must be to the Berenstain family to have so many people remembering the name different – he just sounds bemused.

    Reply
  4. jonny A

    I always remember it as being spelled The Berenstein Bears. Just out of curiousity, when was this first noticed, or when were people talking about this? 2012, 2013 or 2104?

    Reply
    1. Fiona Broome Post author

      Jonny, that’s a good question. I thought the spelling issue had been raised over a year ago, but when I searched posts and comments, the only references (at this website) were this year (2014). Weird.

      Reply
      1. John

        The original “Wood between the Worlds” Berenstain Bears post was August of 2012 (this was the site which eventually led me to Mandela Effect this past Sunday) Synchronicity for me being that the next morning Monday June 23rd 2014 this same author makes his first follow-up post after two years: http://woodbetweenworlds.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/commenting-on-berenstein-bears.html
        This update is an great summary of his experiences since posting and also has a lists of links to other forums discussing it.

        Reply
  5. JM

    That new Wood Between Worlds article seems like a hit piece on the whole Mandela Effect phenomenon. For me though I have an absolute memory of New Zealand being farther north, not north of Australia just noticeably farther north than it is now.

    Reply
    1. Fiona Broome Post author

      Thanks, JM!

      Until someone runs into something radically different from a memory he or she knows is real, it’s kind of difficult to accept the Mandela Effect concept. In the meantime, they can be defensive or even hostile. I’m okay with that. The sheepish emails I receive from formerly snarky people… they take any edge off the skepticism, and give me lots of smiles.

      In my opinion, people who discover one sure memory that doesn’t fit, but still raise an eyebrow about the Mandela Effect… they’re still processing. That’s okay, too. They’ll sort this out eventually. In the meantime, I’m fine with whatever they say, including rejections of my ideas. After all, maybe I’m wrong. None of this can be proved… yet.

      The maps issue fascinates me because we can go back through old maps (in this timestream) and see if past map errors were corrected in recent year. After all, that would explain the different memories. However, all the map searches I’ve run so far… they’re not explaining the alternate locations of some islands and countries.

      Still the maps are great. For a lot of people, it’s easier to say “No, I remember that different” when it’s something visual. That’s more tangible for them. It’s not just words, it’s something they saw. They just need that one sure memory that doesn’t fit. Then, they’re willing to consider the Mandela Effect.

      I’m enjoying these discoveries.

      Cheerfully,
      Fiona

      Reply
    2. Reece

      Hey, Wood Between Worlds author here. I can promise, I wasn’t doing a hit piece on the Mandela Effect. I don’t think you guys are crazy or anything, I think you’re trying to make sense of something that really happened to you; for whatever reason, you really do have memories Mandela dying in the 80’s. I only mentioned you guys at all because you come up so frequently in discussions about the Berenst*in Bears.

      I think the most likely explanation for all of this stuff is a particular kind of memory problem. It’s not simply mis-remembering something, or forgetting something, or being wrong about something. I think especially with the Henry VIII portrait and the Berenst*in Bears, it seems one possible solution is that the human mind just has certain paths it wants to take, and that there are certain concepts or images kind of lying around, and as we recall things from the past we are recalling them in according with these paths and images lying around. I have a notion that King Henry VIII was kind of a glutton, and I have a notion of fat gluttonous kings eating turkey legs, so when I need to recall an image of Henry VIII, I put these things together. This creates a memory, but one associated with the past, and one that is now wrong. You really have this memory, but it’s not a memory of anything real.

      There’s also the possibility of dreams being half-remembered and replacing real memories. I used to have a very vivid memory of Hagrid and Voldemort from Harry Potter being roommates in the Chamber of Secrets. I had visual memory of a scene playing out, with Voldemort going in to his shared room with Hagrid and telling him the jig was up, Hagrid trying to flee, and then the authorities came in. I recently learned that none of that happened, and was confused, because of how strong the memory was. I opened up the book again to double check, and I was totally wrong. It dawned on me that my memory was like a scene from the movie, but that I associated it with reading the book, not watching the movie which only came out years later. I am very sure that I fell asleep while reading and dreamed of that scene, then woke up and resumed reading and put those two together. I have a real memory of Hagrid and Voldemort being roommates, even though they really never were.

      I think there’s definite possibility for those two explanations, and a possibility to gain a greater understanding of the human mind by studying more Mandela Effect phenomena. It’s likely most people just weren’t paying attention on these things, but on some of them, there is probably something really weird or interesting going on, and understanding it may help us understand memory diseases like Alzheimer’s or amnesia.

      The alternate universe hypothesis is a fun one. My cousin and I are currently developing mathematical models of “swapping” when the universes interact. Suppose we made a questionaire of the various Mandela Effects, and asked every one in the world to fill out how they remember each of these events. How many people would we expect to answer all of the questions exactly the same? If universe swapping were occurring, then this would help us understand more about how many universes there are, or how often these things happen.

      There are some questions I’d need to know in order to really investigate this. How many universes are there in which Mandela died in prison? Just one? Or billions? What happens when we cross over? Do two universes “merge”, or do they just swap residents? How many people are swapped each time? What else is different besides Mandela dying thirty years earlier? Are the various permutations of the Mandela Effect phenomena the only universes? So, there’s a universe where Mandela died in prison, New Zealand is north of Australia, there was never the Henry VIII portrait, and they were spelled Berenstain Bears — then another universe where Mandela died in prison, New Zealand is SOUTH of Australia, there was never the Henry VIII portrait, and they were spelled Berenstain Bears?

      I’m asking all of these questions so that I can get a better idea of how we might actually test the hypothesis that there are alternate universes.

      The other thing is, in any universe, under the assumptions made, there are bound to be people with perfect memories — that is, whose memories accord perfectly with the recorded history of this universe. They’ve always been in this universe, and have never left it. They would remember that Mandela never died in jail, New Zealand was always south east ofAustralia, there was never such a portrait of Henry VIII, they were always Berenstain, there was never a show called Taps, etc. How many of them would we expect to exist? We’d need to know more about how many universes there are and what happens at the collisions to really find out, but it gives another way to test the alternate universe idea.

      But then we’d have to ask, based on chance, assuming a single universe and people with occasionally faulty memories, what’s the expected number of people with perfect recollection of facts, or the expected number of people who will agree on a particular string of answers. Would these numbers be different from the numbers with multiple universes and swapping? If not, then this polling idea isn’t a good way to test the alternate universe hypothesis and we need something else. But if it is, then there’d actually be a way to test the idea. You’d just need to do the mathematical models and run some samples. Assuming your model was correct, you could demonstrate the feasibility of the alternate universe hypothesis.

      To me, that would be fun to study. If I had time, then I totally would.

      All that said, I am actually a graduate student in physics, and do want to actually work as an actual scientist someday. While it wasn’t a hit piece, I was trying to distance myself from this page. I think it’s a fun and intriguing idea — mundane differences we normally attribute to faulty memories offering a proof of parallel universes — that would make for an excellent book or movie. But I really can’t lend any credence to it beyond that. As the idea is currently formulated, it reeks to much of anthropocentrism. That is, it is humans and their minds that transfer, but not also physical things like books or maps. Why would the universe target humans? How would the process of transfer even recognize humans? Also, it tends to focus on the things that humans focus on — people dying, the locations of island nations, spellings of names — but not on the things that the universe cares about, like all of the billions of billions of atoms displaced during the 1980’s prison riots when Mandela died, and all the entropy and heat and CO2 produced in the roof fires that no doubt followed. Did global CO2 levels decrease for us when we transferred? Did some of the CO2 come with us? Did the global entropy decrease or us when we transferred? To really make the theory scientific, we’d have to have an explanation, and one that works at the physical level, not just the psychological and sociological level.

      But I think it’s a fun idea, and I don’t think it’s any weirder than some of the other stuff people believe. Make sense of the world however you want. You’re not crazy for having a “wrong” memory, and I understand your motivations for holding on to it, which are also normal. I don’t personally believe it, but who am I, really?

      TL;DR It wasn’t a hit piece, I think it’s a fun idea in a science-fiction kind of way, it isn’t a scientific idea and not one I take seriously in describing reality, I think there are other psychological explanations that make more sense, but I really don’t care what you guys decide to believe and have no interest in insulting this group or calling you crazy.

      Cheers,
      Reece

      Reply
      1. Fiona Broome Post author

        Hi, Reece!

        Wow… thanks for posting that lengthy, thoughtful comment! For me, there was no DR and it was not TL. I’m a big fan of “what if…?” discussions and speculation, and your comments raised lots of cool questions. I like to think that nearly everything at this site is open for intelligent discussion. That’s not insulting, and I didn’t feel as if you were calling me or my readers “crazy.”

        I know that I recall Mandela’s death. It’s not a fleeting memory. It covered many days. “Sliding” from one reality to another seems the simplest explanation, but I’m sure it’s not the only one. What stood out for me were the number of things I recalled that exactly matched what others said in the Dragon*Con green room when we first discussed this.

        Ditto my annoyance over the amount of media coverage of Billy Graham’s funeral. It’s an extended, rich memory. Lots of days, lots of irritation. I mean, he’s a great man who’s done wonderful things and provided comfort to millions, but when he died (in my timestream), his funeral pre-empted many regular TV shows. The bulk of my memories, over several days, included turning on the TV and seeing his funeral on every major network. I’d surf through the channels, sigh, and turn off the TV in frustration.

        The Henry VIII painting is very clear in my mind, and it was in the Holbein style. However, in my case, there may be a simple answer. I had access to the back rooms of a major American art museum. The museum had been sold many convincing forgeries over about a 10-year period. I may have seen the painting there, and — when it was exposed as a fake — the painting vanished along with all records of it. That was the tidy way to deal with the embarrassment. So, I won’t rule out a very logical, normal explanation for that memory.

        You’ve raised some great questions… really great questions. And, for the record: I didn’t take your article as a hit piece, but I understand why some might have felt defensive when they read it. I try to understand both sides. It’s what I do.

        For some, the Mandela Effect is just plain strange. That’s okay. If I didn’t have the memories I do, I’d feel that way, as well.

        Also, I understand when people have an alternate memory or two but want to distance themselves from this particular explanation. That’s equally fine with me.

        Since I spent a lot of my childhood (and adult years) at M.I.T., I understand intellectual curiosity. I’m also familiar with the need for professionals to distance themselves from extreme and unproved theories and phenomena. On some of my research trips, you’d think we were all at an AA meeting: “Hello, my name is Henry, and I’m interested in the Marfa Lights,” or whatever.

        Okay, I’m being flippant, but more people are interested in this topic than are willing to admit to it. I completely understand that, as well.

        Anyway…

        You mentioned the idea that humans and their minds seem to transfer, but other things don’t.

        Good point, and physical things might transfer. I’m not sure about that. I was kind of rattled when I was collecting past comments for this article but none were from before 2014. I was nearly certain this topic had come up around 2012. In fact, I can remember talking with one of my kids about it, before she moved to another state in 2012, and the only way I’d raise the topic is if it was at this website. In general, I don’t go looking for more weird topics; they have to show up here… but where are the 2012 comments about Berenstain and Berenstein Bears? They’re not showing up in any searches I do. I plan to go through my backup copies of the site. It might be a simple restore-from-backups issue at the server, and something fell off the site in the process. (As time permits, I always look for a logical explanation, first.)

        Physical changes interest me, because they aren’t events, per se. I think we have some: For example, NZ and Sri Lanka in different places. The guy who used Google Earth to look at his childhood school, but it’s now an older building… like 80 years older than when he went there, and now it’s made of bricks. (I need to follow-up on that. It might have been a Google Earth glitch, albeit an unlikely one. He said the neighboring features were a match for his childhood memories; only the school was different.)

        Those are big things, and make me wonder about smaller things. Like when someone thought he left the keys by the front door — in fact, he’s about 99% sure he did — but they turn up on the kitchen counter. Is that merely a faulty memory? Occam’s, without a doubt, but is it the right answer?

        Also, I’ve been surprised that we don’t have any comments about eye colors changing, or a birthmark or scar moving, or something like that. Unless this is a holodeck and I keep creating the same avatar with no variations, or I’m always in this physical body in the holodeck (as in Star Trek), it seems to me that something should change, physically. Why does NZ move, but I still have a scar on my lower lip?

        So far, casual studies suggest that we’re not “sliding” together or uniformly. Some people recall just one or two things from the list of alternate memories, and they’re absolutely certain their other memories match the current, “normal” world. I know that my own memories include less than half the alternates. However, many of the rest are things that I wouldn’t have paid much attention to, anyway.

        I see this as a website that’s collecting data, but — so far — that data is incomplete and unaligned.

        I try to run surveys now and then, like the one about TAPS v. Ghost Hunters, where people were when they first saw the show, and what they thought it was called. I really thought it would turn out that conservative newspapers and TV stations called it “TAPS,” to intrigue people; they knew most of their audience would feel “Ghost Hunters” was disturbingly un-Christian.

        But, that’s not how the replies have lined up. The TAPS memory seems to be all over the map. Literally. (And one star of the show, Jason Hawes, is insistent that he never allowed others to use the TAPS name for the show… but how would he know if Houston, Texas’ newspapers used the TAPS name for a couple of weeks? Of course, he wouldn’t.) I can understand that the show featured the truck and hats and maybe some tee-shirts that said TAPS, so a few viewers were confused. However, at this point, that doesn’t answer all the questions.

        I’m not sure that I’m looking for a single answer to this. To be honest, I’d probably be uneasy if the Mandela Effect was nice and tidy. As weird phenomena go, this doesn’t feel like a “one size fits all” topic. In fact, I suspect we’re looking at several different phenomena, but describing them in the context of memories.

        What I don’t know is what those phenomena might be. “Sliding” seems to fit as well as anything, at the moment, but I’m open to other explanations… aside from crazy, delusional, or stupid, that is.

        I’ve rambled, but your comments raised many great points and I wanted to reply to a few of them. Others need more thought. They’re very, very good, and I appreciate you taking the time to share your views and questions.

        Thanks!

        Cheerfully,
        Fiona

        Reply
        1. Julia

          I can’t help it – I have to mention this. My grandmother, who died in 1995, had a birthmark identical to mine – a small round indentation about 3/4 of inch in diameter, symmetrically placed just below our necks. I’ve never seen anyone else with this birthmark. A doctor once started to ask me if I had had a tracheotomy, when she realized it wasn’t quite in the right place for a breathing tube.

          Anyway, I seen the birthmark all of my life, but it was gone the last few years, and she couldn’t remember having it (though she did have some dementia.) At one point, she did have a pacemaker put in, and I reason that that MUST be the reason the birthmark disappeared – somehow when the did surgery that part of her skin was removed and healed without the birthmark – which as an indentation isn’t just a mark on the skin but something you can physically feel – but that always seemed really strange – as did her lack of memory of it. So – lol – maybe birthmarks can disappear. WHO KNOWS?

          Reply
      2. Pryce

        “I used to have a very vivid memory of Hagrid and Voldemort from Harry Potter being roommates in the Chamber of Secrets. I had visual memory of a scene playing out, with Voldemort going in to his shared room with Hagrid and telling him the jig was up, Hagrid trying to flee, and then the authorities came in.”

        It’s news to me that this didn’t happen…

        Reply
        1. Reece

          Voldemort revealed Hagrid, but they weren’t roommates. In the book, Hagrid used to go to the dungeon to raise his spider, and Voldemort caught him. In my memory, Hagrid kept the spider in a box in his room in Slytherin house, and that’s where Voldemort caught him. I even had a memory that after Hagrid told the kids about this, they remarked on him being a Slytherin, and Hagrid pulling out a handkerchief, dabbing his face, and saying “I know… I’m so ashamed”, or something like that. I only found out ten years later that Hagrid was never in Slytherin.

          Reply
  6. Mika Cooper

    Read them to both my children starting in the early 1990s. Definitely they were always the BerenstAin Bears!

    Reply
    1. Fiona Broome Post author

      Mika, that’s great if your timestream always had the Berenstain spelling. It’s just not what others remember from their respective timestreams.

      Reply
  7. JM

    The thing about physics is the higher level material you get into, post-grad etc, the more squirelly and esoteric it becomes. There is a hubris about physics at the grade 12 level where everything is Newtonian, but some of the more advanced college level stuff is pretty out there.

    Reply
  8. Vivek narain

    Can’t help thinking that matrix is a child,changing just a vowel in a children’s book is certainly a childish prank and so is with, the vampire and a vampire,vampire concept is also childish sense of ghoulish humour.May be in eons to follow the matrix will grow up to be a man/woman and stop confounding hapless mortals.

    Reply
  9. samferina

    check this out http://www.momversation.com/video/berenstein-bears
    plus I too remember Berenstein Bears as well. I had a collection of those books which my fave being “No Girls Allowed” even my Husbands mother who use to work in the kid section in the Library distinctively remembers BerenSTEIN!! I asked her to spell it to make sure and she said No not Stain but Stein. I asked my cousin and sister the same and they all 100% agreed.

    Reply
  10. ken

    I definitely remember it as being Berenstein Bears…. I recall when the author (Jan) passed away in 2012, the headlines spelled Berenstain, and I had this weird feeling that it was not right. So I googled up ‘Jan Berenstein’ and got no results. I didn’t understand it, and thought i typed it wrong. I looked back at the headline and saw the name was Berenstain. I shrugged, and forgot about it until a cousin posted on facebook about this. That brought back my memory of reading the books and it definitely was Berenstein. Today at work, I asked everyone what they remembered it was spelled as. EVERY one of them said STEIN…. My brain is fried today, thanks to this weirdly outworldly tid-bit….

    Reply
  11. Joe Crollard

    Fiona Broome, I’m a writer for a local paper in Port Angeles Washington, and was hoping I could get a clearer explanation of your theory and perhaps ask you a few other questions. I sent you an email through your contact form but wanted to make sure you at least got it. Let me know if you think you can provide some information. Thanks!

    Reply
  12. Pokebert

    I also remember it clearly being Berenstein. I remember my grandma had the books for me to read as a little kid; strangely, I don’t think I’ve seen them in the last few years.

    Reply
  13. BrandonD

    It was definitely spelled BerenSTEIN but pronounced BerenSTAIN – I distinctly remember this because the name was not pronounced how it was spelled. That is precisely the reason why I remember it, if it was spelled STEIN and pronounced STEIN, then there is nothing unusual about it and no reason to specifically remember it.

    Reply
    1. Gurluas

      Are you sure “Stain” was the alternate pronounciation and not “Steen”`?

      Because that’d be very curious.

      Reply
      1. BrandonD

        I’m only remembering how my mom said it was pronounced when I was a kid. She pronounced it BerenSTAIN but when I looked at the books it was written BerenSTEIN, and that was the reason it stood out for me: it was spelled and pronounced differently.

        This brings to mind an interesting observation: what if these sort of “reality alterations” are happening much more frequently than we realize, only we do not notice them because they are details that we didn’t pay much attention to, in the way that I paid specific attention to this name.

        Reply
        1. Sarah

          I don’t normally comment, but this is freaking me out. My situation seems to be a little different because most of the time travel theorists here are claiming that it was always E.
          I remember it being spelled BerenstAin. Pronunciation varied between STEEN and STAIN sounds.
          However, I just went to visit my friend a couple states away over the 4th of July. She had one of the old books that we ended up reading to her young nephew. It was the Bear Scout one.
          I distinctly remember looking at the cover and thinking “Huh that’s weird. This one is spelled with an E… Berenstein Bears. Must be an early edition and they changed it later”.
          Now I’m scared because today I find out about a bunch of people claiming there was never an E spelling? I will try to get her to take a picture of the book with the E. Because I am certain that is what I saw. I only noticed it because it was different than the spelling I remember.

          Reply
          1. Sarah

            Ok. So my friend sent me a picture of her book. It is now an A. I don’t know what this means…

  14. Pingback: Did You Know There’s A Word For When You're Totally Positive Something Happened Even Though It Didn't? | Whats the Buzz ?Whats the Buzz ?

  15. Pingback: Did You Know There’s A Term For When You're Totally Positive Something Happened Even Though It Didn't?

  16. Cathy

    I’m thinking I remember saying steen because it’s a more common pronunciation, whereas stain (beren-stain) sounded funny. I also remember a sensed dichotomy between the spelling and expected pronunciation, and I would let my mind slide over it without dwelling on it or thinking about it. BUT now that I’m reading these comments, I’m wondering if it WAS steen! And pronounced stain?! That would have been a dichotomy as well.

    Reply
  17. jen

    I remember watching a show called the Berenstein Bears on TV. Definitely not the Berenstain Bears.

    I also remember the Kelis song “Lil Star” being out years before it did (early 2000s) and mentioned to my husband it being a rerelease and he didn’t remember it at all. Upon looking it was only released in 2007.

    Reply
  18. Christine C.

    Funnily enough, I remember it being spelled with an E– Berenstein– and not knowing how it was pronounced. I watched the TV show for a while that pronounced it “Berenstain” in the theme song and found that pretty strange.

    Reply
  19. Cynthia M.

    An informal family poll of 5 persons reveals that we all remember the spelling Berenstein, with the youngest of us (41 yo) remembering a pronunciation of “stain” while the rest are “steen”. All baron, not burn. Wild!

    Reply
  20. Poppy

    It was ABSOLUTELY “Berenstein” and nothing will convince me otherwise (no, not even the family!) I wonder if it was spelled different;y in different countries – ? (Much like thinking the U.S> has 52 states, which I also distinctly remember learning in school, coincidentally.)

    Reply
  21. Matt Roberts

    Hey! I was told about this site from a friend, and now I’m hooked. I was a child in the 80s, I grew up reading those books, watching the cartoons, and I even had one or two little figurines sold by, I believe, Burger King. I might still have one floating around my house somewhere. I most definitely remember STEIN, as does my wife. As another commenter mentioned, I distinctly remember as a kid trying to figure out how to say the last name, whether it was STEEN or STINE.

    My entire life I’ve had dreams of places that I had never been before, and know for a fact I had never been to those places. And then some time later, I’ll go to them. I once described a dream of a place so well to a buddy of mine, that when we passed by that place on a drive through the country, he noticed it before me. I don’t know if there ARE alternate realities, but I like to believe there are. Always have.

    Reply
  22. chase

    I cant say I fully remember if it was stain or stein. but I remember I always went by stein or steen! And so did the TV show. The narrarator also called them the steins. quite glad ive discovered this website.. figured out alot today. and still much work needs to be done

    Reply
  23. Az Wolfy

    From Sri Lanka. Just wanted to confirm that I remember this being “Berenstein” as well. I had a book with me a long time ago and was one of my favorites. It’s gone now…

    Reply
  24. meme brulee

    Possible other convergence of timelines, I remember the comedian Eddie Griffin dying like 10 years ago, and apparently he’s still alive

    Reply
  25. Daniel

    This whole Berenstein/Berenstain fiasco is what introduced me to the mandela effect. I definitely remember it being BerenSTEIN. And I would always make sure to enunciate the STEEN not STAIN. We owned many of the books an read them all the time as a kid but they are all gone now. I even confirmed this with my grandmother and she definitely remembers it being Berenstein also.

    Reply
  26. JM

    I also remember 52 states. This is one of the most compelling of all the ‘shared alternate memories’ because you would think it’s a very set in stone type of thing, why would there be so many anomalous memories surrounding it?

    If I had to put my thumb on when things began shifting, I would say around 1991-1993. That seems to be some sort of nexus point of shifts, one of them at least.

    I had the strangest experience when I was about 9 years old, must have been a timeline shift.

    It was 1990 or 91, it was the end of an eventful summer with lots of vacations. I was sitting on top of our steep driveway and looking up at the sky. And I was staring into the sky I said to myself “I’m on Mars now”. That’s how I interpreted it as a kid, some sort of intuitive gnosis that reality had just shifted. Something deep inside me saying “what the hell?” I just got shifted to an alternate Earth. The thought “I’m on mars now” just popped into my mind, not as an idea but as a knowing. Mars in this sense representing a sort of Earth B, resembling the current one but different.

    I feel that this 1991 time period was one the shifts first began, and probably why I was able to notice it.

    Reply
  27. Alex S

    It has always been the BerentSTEIN Bears. As a child I remember mispronouncing the name as “Burn-steen” until the cartoon came out and the narrator clearly stated them as the “Beren-STEIN Bears”. I’m curious to find an old book to see what I can find. I’m no stranger to this whole Mandella Effect, however. I clearly remember a separate book as a child, one of those picture bibles for children that had a whole passage that one day was suddenly missing as if it were never in existence.

    Reply
  28. Jessica

    I was a very voracious reader as a child and I have a distinct memory of them being the BerenSTEIN Bears. I’m really weirded out by this!

    Reply
  29. Vivek narain

    For a week there were 42 thoughts,and now 2 thoughts have been added (18 and 19 august) but the column says 43 thoughts.On actual counting it comes out to maybe 41,it is too much of a job could be i am wrong here.

    Reply
  30. di

    I remember the books, a long time ago, as being Berenstein Bears, and I thought it was a funny name & spelling and I didn’t know how to pronounce it at first. When did the publisher start making the change to the ‘stain’ spelling. It has been a topic at work, 3 of us thought it was Stein, and 1 thought stain, but we all pronounced it as stain. Who knows?????

    Reply
  31. JM

    Found this on Reddit.

    Here’s an image from the Office Season 8, it shows team names for a quiz in a gay bar with ‘spoof’ team names, what’s important though is that they use ‘stein’. http://imgur.com/Qv3PMvT (The guy added the highlight.)

    Reply
  32. My mind BTFO

    I came on here to relate a story and immediately I saw this, the blood ran out of my head, pretty freaky mang.
    My wife and I have discussed this, we remember Berenstein Bears…wow

    Reply
  33. Hope Shellnutt

    Hey im 18 and it wasnt long ago for me to remember this but i always remembered The BerenSTEIN Bears not berenstain? why stain? what the heck. so i looked all over for my books, no luck, then i came across 2 just the other day and it said Beren”stain” bears! my friend even said he remember Berenstein! and even when i google Jan and Mike Berenstein, google corrects me and puts Berenstain. and all othe the pictures of the books show Berenstain. The Berenstein Bears were named after Jan and Mike’s last name: Berenstein! Even auto-correct changes it to Berenstain! My question is how the heck was it all changed and why change it in the 1st place?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Protected with IP Blacklist CloudIP Blacklist Cloud