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The Mandela Effect is evidence that you may have experienced events from a different reality. Finding others with similar memories can affirm that.

Those connections are important. This website is where many of them started.

To understand what the Mandela Effect is, click this link for the YouTube video.

For a far longer list of reported memories, see the Memories page and its links.

If you’re reading through all the comments posted in Memories, here are links, in date order: 12345678910 – 1112131415

More pages: SitemapAbout this siteTheoriesFree DIY t-shirt designs – Legal/PrivacyFAQs

Time Travel – Real Science

Some Mandela Effect experiences might be linked to time travel.

How would that work…?

Time Travel - Real Science - Mandela EffectWell, you might have gone forward in time – a day, a year, or another short leap that wouldn’t seem obviously out-of-sync with present time.

Let’s say that’s what happened to those of us who remembered Nelson Mandela dying before 2013.

Maybe, staring at the TV back in 1988 (or whenever), we “slid” forward to 2013 and saw Mandela’s funeral on TV.

A blink (perhaps literally) later, we were whisked back to 1988… and went out to the kitchen for a snack from the refrigerator.

In our minds, Mandela had died. We felt sad, but knew his health had been shaky after a hunger strike in prison.

After that, each of us got caught up in school or work or other daily activities. We didn’t think anything about the funeral… until, one day, Nelson Mandela was on the TV. And he wasn’t dead.

It seemed like a “what the ____?” moment, but we figured we must have been mistaken. (That didn’t make sense, because the memory was so clear, but… well, what other explanation could there be?)

And then, in 2009 or so, we discovered that others remembered Mandela’s earlier death.  Many of them remembered the exact same details as we did, too. (Cue the “Twilight Zone” music? That’s how it felt, to me.)

And sure, you could use this same scenario for memories like the Berenstain/Berenstein Bears, Jif/Jiffy peanut butter, the number of US states, and so on.

All of them could be explained as time travel so brief, we didn’t even notice it. (Okay, some alternate history memories fit that concept better than others. I still resist the idea that the Mandela Effect has a one-size-fits-all explanation.)

Anyway… today, I was reading a Higgypop article about serious scientists working on time travel. It’s fascinating. For me, one quote from Professor Tamara Davis stood out:

Tamara told the BBC, “something out there is having an anti-gravity effect, it’s pushing rather than pulling. We don’t know what that is, but it makes up most of the Universe. We call it dark energy.”

“By understanding this mysterious energy, we could be a step closer to time travel. It’s thought that dark energy may be the key to manipulating a wormhole and taking advantage of its route to another point in time.”

I was also intrigued by a reference by Johannes Handsteiner, talking about quantum entanglement.

Einstein, who hated the notion, called this “spooky action at a distance” and defined it as two particles behaving as one no matter how far apart they are.

Those are just a few interesting tidbits from that article. As a Mandela Effect researcher – and, like you, someone fascinated by possible explanations –  I recommend reading it.

If you’re a time travel enthusiast, watch this short video. (If you’re confused, don’t worry. I kept pausing it and rewinding it, saying, “Wait, what…?” LOL)

In general, I haven’t a clue what’s causing the Mandela Effect. Time travel is as good a guess as any, and it’s among my favorites. (You may have better explanations. I’m constantly impressed by the theories that readers suggest.)

The Higgypop article sparked my interest, as some of its ideas were new to me.

Resources

What are your thoughts about time travel as a Mandela Effect explanation? (Comments at this article will be open for one week.)

Fiona on Coast to Coast AM, Tonight

Very late tonight (Monday, June 18/19), I’ll be a guest during the second half of George Noory’s radio show, Coast to Coast AM. 

I expect to talk about the Mandela Effect, but also about other areas of paranormal research. The show will be recorded so you can listen to it later. (In the eastern US, my segment of Coast to Coast AM airs from 3 AM to 5 AM. I’m hoping to be awake enough to say the things I want to say… and not blurt things as I sometimes do when I’m tired.)

Here’s the blurb from the Coast to Coast AM website.

Fiona Broome will be on Coast to Coast AM, tonight

Coast to Coast AM subscribers can hear the replay almost immediately.

In addition, Coast to Coast AM shows are available at YouTube, about three weeks after they initially aired.

When Time Travel Goes Pear-Shaped

When time travel goes pear-shaped.In February 2018, scientists raised a troubling question, especially for those who think the Mandela Effect may relate to time travel.

Extrapolating from lab tests, it looks like time can only travel from past to present, not vice versa.

(I’ve kept expecting an “err… umm” retraction, but I haven’t seen one, yet.)

Here’s one article about this:  Physicists Have Confirmed a Pear-Shaped Nucleus, And It Could Ruin Time Travel Forever

The following highlights may explain the problem.

Physicists have confirmed the existence of a new form of atomic nuclei, and the fact that it’s not symmetrical challenges the fundamental theories of physics that explain our Universe.

“We’ve found these nuclei literally point towards a direction in space. This relates to a direction in time, proving there’s a well-defined direction in time and we will always travel from past to present,” Marcus Scheck from the University of the West of Scotland told Kenneth MacDonald at BBC News at the time.

According to the laws of physics, at the time of the Big Bang*, equal amounts of matter and antimatter had to have been created, but now, billions of years later, we’re surrounded by heaps of matter (solid, liquid, gas, and plasma), and there appears to be almost no naturally occurring antimatter.

“This is a puzzling feature, as the theory of relativistic quantum mechanics suggests we should have equal amounts of the two,” mathematician Gianluca Sarri from Queen’s University Belfast in the UK writes for The Conversation.

“In fact, no current model of physics can explain the discrepancy.”

It’s a pretty out-there hypothesis, but Scheck says that this uneven distribition of mass and charge causes Barium-144’s nucleus to ‘point’ in a certain direction in spacetime, and this bias could explain why time seems to only want to go from past to present, and not backwards, even if the laws of physics don’t care which way it goes.

Of course, there’s no way of proving that without further evidence, but the discovery is yet another indication that the Universe might not be as symmetrical as the Standard Model of Physics needs it to be, and proving that could usher us into a whole new era of theoretical physics.

This research intrigues me, because time travel (or time manipulation) has been part of many Mandela Effect conversations.
But, I’m anticipating at least one logical argument: Perhaps someone traveled back in time and planted the nuclei that suggest a one-way flow of time. If so, it’s an effective red herring – for now anyway.
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*Those who believe in the “big bang” theory of the Universe may not be entirely happy with other recent announcements: Massive Genetic Study Reveals 90 Percent Of Earth’s Animals Appeared At The Same Time and Sweeping gene survey reveals new facets of evolution. (Those are two different views of the same basic information.)
Of course, creation, evolution, and “12th planet” histories are an entirely different topic from the Mandela Effect. But, such interesting and radical theories are emerging, I decided to alert you that “everyone knows” histories may be changing. In my opinion, they’re tilting in interesting directions.
Whether or not the possibility of time travel affects Mandela Effect theories – well, that’s another question. (And yes, I suppose the best answer is, “Only time will tell.”)

A Fun Mandela Effect Test

This week, I discovered a quirky, fun test related to the Mandela Effect. It’s created by AlternateMemories.com.

The test is: Take the Mandela Effect Test.

a fun Mandela Effect testI took the test and my results were around 50%. I’ll attribute at least half of that score to normal mistakes.

  • Several questions were related to movies I’d never seen but knew about from ads. So, my guesses were more from pop culture than memory.
  • Some were about topics I’d studied casually, but didn’t remember clearly. Again, I was guessing.
  • Less than half of my answers were things I was certain about. Did I get them right, in this reality…? I haven’t a clue. (I didn’t double-check. As is often the case, this week is particularly busy.)

Nevertheless, I think the quiz is great fun.  I wouldn’t take the results very seriously.

In my opinion, it’s more of a great conversation starter.

After taking the test, I contacted someone at AlternateMemories.com. My questions were more rushed than tactful, as I asked him about the intent of his site.

(In the past, I’ve linked hastily to commercial sites, podcasts, and videos… and then been chagrined to discover their agendas and motivations weren’t aligned with my beliefs or what I’m doing.)

Today, the replies I received from someone at AlternateMemories.com were straightforward and more than a little witty. Frankly, I like that kind of dialogue.

Being immersed in this topic for nearly 10 years – and perhaps with tunnel vision, at this point – I’m delighted when others see fresh, new ways to explore the Mandela Effect.

So, I recommend taking the test for a few chuckles, and perhaps some “Hmm… what is the correct answer, in this reality…?” explorations.

And, as I said, I think it’s great conversation fodder.

But don’t hit the panic button if your test score shows you’re nearly 100% impacted by the Mandela Effect.

Instead, it might reflect how much you’ve tuned into pop culture, which can play fast-and-loose with facts, and deliberately misquote (or downright misrepresent) events and media, to avoid potential trademark liabilities.

 

Mandela Effect – Your Personal Tipping Point

Mandela Effect - Your memories are realWhen people contact me about the Mandela Effect, their messages are usually about one of three things:

  • A new example of the Mandela Effect they’ve discovered or recently read about.
  • A question about someone else’s evidence that the Mandela Effect is real.
  • Their personal tipping point. Those emails usually include a story, and then something like “that’s when I knew it wasn’t just me.”

The latter are among the most personally rewarding. I’m delighted that the Mandela Effect confirms people’s memories. It helps them realize they’re not alone, and – no – they’re not “crazy.”

The fact is, as much as I try to avoid conspiracy theories, apparent history can be manipulated.

But, that’s not the only explanation for the Mandela Effect. In fact, that explanation makes me break out in hives.

I prefer to believe that we’re sliding back & forth between (or perhaps through) very similar, parallel realities.

The differences may be so slight, we don’t always notice. Not until something jarring comes along, like Berenstain Bears’ book titles. Or the death of Billy Graham.

But, if you’re looking for proof of the Mandela Effect, I’m sorry but I have none.

In fact, I’m skeptical when someone shows me a photo they claim is an actual Berenstein Bears book from their granny’s attic. Or a photo of a newspaper that has a headline confirming another Mandela Effect memory. Those things can be faked.

In my opinion, social proof is probably as good as it gets, for now.  

Talk about your Mandela Effect memories. Find others who recall the same (or similar) things. When other people remember what you remember, and then add a few details you didn’t mention (perhaps on purpose), that’s when you’ll know “it’s not just you.”

Meanwhile, trust your memories. Don’t default to “I’m going crazy.” There are far too many people who’ll eagerly agree with you, and make things worse. Because: trolls and bullies.

They’re dealing with their own internal demons. Don’t let it become contagious.

The reality you’re in now… it’s where you are now. Just like traveling from one geographical area to another, where accents are different, people are still people. Your life isn’t going off the rails, even if several data points seem different where you are now.

Also, there’s no right/wrong in this. Someone who’s always remembered the children’s books as the Berenstain Bears, is simply someone who hasn’t traveled to the same realities you have.

Both of you are “right” in the context of your personal histories.

Trust your memories. No matter where they came from, and how different they are from the reality you’re in now, they’re still your memories. They’re part of who you are.

Try to look at the changes as, “Ooh, isn’t that interesting. Things are different here.” And then let it go.

But, when you meet someone with memories that match yours, I think it’s important to affirm them.

That’s why I created another t-shirt design.

This one says “Mandela Effect – Your memories are real.”

Mandela Effect t-shirt - memories are realYou can download a ready-to-iron-on design here: Click here. It’s a Google Drive link. That’s a GIF you’ll print onto transfer paper.

  • The lettering in the GIF includes a black-letter version and a white-letter one.
  • The design is already backwards so it’ll iron on correctly.

Or, if you want a ready-made t-shirt, you may be able to buy it at Amazon.  (Each of our tee shirts are available for just a short time.) Here are the links:

Mostly, I think it’s important to believe and trust your own memories. Once someone starts convincing you that your memories aren’t real… that’s a slippery slope to a very unhappy place.

Your memories are real.  When you remember something like the Berenstein Bears books –  or any of the other Mandela Effect memories that others share – and you talk about this with others, that’s when you’ll know.

It’s not “just you” and you are not alone.

That X-Files Episode

HollywoodLife.com story headline
HollywoodLife.com story headline

A recent episode of the X-Files (reboot) uses the Mandela Effect as a story element.

I’m astonished. (That’s an understatement.) I never expected the Mandela Effect to attract so much attention.

Really, this still seems kind of surreal.

I haven’t seen the X-Files episode yet, but – from descriptions, such as the one at Hollywood Life – it sounds like a great parody.

(Should I be offended by their portrayal? It sounds zany, not insulting, and really, it’s just fiction and on TV, as well. I may change my opinion after I see the episode, but – for now – I’m chuckling.)

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UPDATE

I watched the show (Season 11, Episode 4, “The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat”). I’m still chuckling. Yes, they were a little heavy handed with the political references. That was a surprise, since the show was broadcast on Fox. But, I’m aware that Fox and Fox News are independently managed.

But, putting politics firmly to one side (let’s not go there in comments), I was thoroughly pleased with the representation of the Mandela Effect. It was well-explained (well enough) and treated lightly.

To me, the shows seemed stylish and whimsical. I’m delighted. (This was the first time I’d ever watched an X-Files episode all the way through.)

I also loved the question left hanging at the end of that episode, about whether Reggie was a madman, or someone being silenced.

So, I’m pleased. For me, being the topic of an X-Files episode is about as close to a social “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” as it gets. It moves Mandela Effect discussions further into the mainstream.

The more people talk about it – and weed out what’s true, what’s not, and what’s baffling – the closer we may get to understanding this phenomenon.

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FREE T-SHIRT DESIGNS

Want to start a conversation about the Mandela Effect? A t-shirt could be useful.

These printable designs are already reversed so – as long as you have some variety of iron-on (transfer) paper – you can print the design, and then iron it onto your own t-shirts. Or whatever you like.

Here are the DIY T-shirt designs, so far (more are on the way):

1.) The Mandela Effect – What a Reality (The single-page graphic includes a white-letter version and a black-letter version. Trim the transfer to fit your needs.) Click here for the transparent GIF featuring both color choices, for personal, DIY use.Mandela Effect - what a reality!
(Trivia: That’s a design I created for my own t-shirt. It’s what I’ve worn for the past year or so. I get nods, and the occasional request to be part of a selfie.)

2.) and 3.) Instant Reality-Shift Translator – Two different iron-on designs. The first has Black letters (to print on light-colored fabric). The second has White letters (to print on black and dark-colored t-shirts).

Free Mandela Effect Iron-on(That t-shirt design does not say “Mandela Effect” on it, on purpose. It’s designed to spark conversations, but Mandela Effect fans will recognize it right away. Not quite a “secret handshake,” but not entirely obvious, either.)

4.) Mandela Effect Universe – This design is a little more difficult to use as a DIY design. (You may want to order the Amazon t-shirt, already made.)

Mandela Effect Starry Universe t-shirtThe design is entirely in shades of white and grey. Whatever color shirt you iron it onto… that will be the color of the background and the lettering. (To show the design clearly, I’ve used a black background in the illustration above.) Click here to download the transparent GIF for DIY use.

Yes, to cover the hosting bill for this website, we’d already started creating new Mandela Effect t-shirt designs, mostly for fun, but also for people who don’t want to use the DIY versions. (Some are a little too finicky for DIY designs, too. It’s better to trust the professionals with them.)

Note: Comments on this post were open through early Feb 9th. They are now closed.

Star Trek’s “Mirror, Mirror” Reality

Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the original Star Trek’s “Mirror, Mirror” episode.

By NBC Television (eBay item photo front / photo back press release) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Though many of the characters were polar opposites of their prime reality selves, some continuity made the concept credible.

Does it hold up, today? I’m not sure.

Of course, the Mandela Effect is (usually) more subtle than this, but an io9 article — Happy 50th Birthday to Star Trek’s Mirror Universe — raises a few interesting questions.

For example:

  • Most of us have noticed products, spellings, and events that don’t match our memories. But, how many people have noticed other people with radically different personalities or histories?
  • If you “slid” into an alternate reality, did your skills and personality quirks seem to surprise people who (in your prime reality) knew you well?
  • Do you think that people can change, from reality to reality? Or, is there a general continuity to how each of us behave, no matter where/when we are?

Of course, there are no clear and definitive answers on a broad scale. I’m still interested in individual answers to this.

Comments are now closed. (Don’t worry, I’ll write more articles in the future, and open each of them — briefly — to comments. Meanwhile, Reddit seems to be the best place for wider discussions.)

Personal note to a private comment: rs, you’re describing exactly what I’m talking about. This is an area that needs more research. I may explore this more deeply in 2018.

Las Vegas Anomalies… Connection?

This isn’t exactly a Mandela Effect issue.

Well, maybe.

There was so much confusion over Tom Petty’s death, people are still sorting out what really happened in this reality, and when. (I’m content to attribute the first announcements as bad reporting on a busier-than-usual news day.)

But, I won’t rule out some Mandela Effect glitches over the past couple of days.

What I am looking for — and I need your help for this — is what (if anything) might connect multiple Las Vegas events.

I still consider ley lines a possible factor, in terms of who experiences the Mandela Effect, and why.

Yes, I could say the Las Vegas events follow a ley line. All of the odd events happened in within a few blocks of each other, and within 1000 feet of a very narrow (20 feet or so) line.

But, it’s Las Vegas. The hospitality sites (casinos, hotels, restaurants) are in a single, very compact location.

And, it being Vegas, there’s no shortage of odd things happening every day.

What I’m looking at are three (or four) truly unusual things, even for Vegas. But I want something more than just “they’re all at the Vegas strip.”

My first thought is to look at astrology. (For the record: I already know it doesn’t actually correlate with astronomy. I just look at related behaviors, and wonder if there may be a quantum connection we don’t know yet.)

First, on 20 Dec 2015, a woman lost control of her car on Las Vegas Blvd, and drove into several dozen people. That same night, practically within shouting distance, Steve Harvey managed to announce the wrong person as Miss Universe.

Two nights later, a Russian spacecraft blew up over Vegas, and it was so bright, people actually saw the space debris, despite the glare of all the casinos & hotels.

And then, on 1 Oct 2017, Americans witnessed a horrific shooting just blocks from the 2015 incidents.

Those are all anomalies.

I’ve located the astrology chart for the Mandalay Bay/Harvest Festival shooting: https://www.astrotheme.com/astrology/2017_Las_Vegas_Strip_shooting

Also, I have a Las Vegas chart for the 9 PM (time guessed), the day of the 2015 Miss Universe pageant. Here’s that link: http://mandelaeffect.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/LV-AstroChart1.gif

But, I know just enough about astrology to be dangerous. So, if you can read astrological charts and see anything odd that connect those two charts, let me know.

(See my original article, below, for more details.)


Several odd things happened in Las Vegas in late December 2015. In a city where “odd” is a way of life, anything beyond their “normal” is especially interesting.

Las Vegas photos courtesy Justin Taylor and Freeimages.com

This is a good example of data points — a specific location, and closely connected events (times) — that may relate to my theory about alternate realities.

At the moment, I’m speculating that something happened around that location… something we don’t understand, yet. And, whatever that was — a temporal distortion, perhaps — caused people to do things they’d never do in a normal setting.

(Yes, I’m grasping at straws. I know that. It’s how much of my most innovative research starts. I take “what if…?” questions and see where they lead. Most hit roadblocks, quickly. But, the 10% or so that succeed make this process worthwhile.)

Here’s what happened:

First Las Vegas Anomaly

First, a woman drove her car onto a crowded sidewalk, just outside the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino. Descriptions of the event varied, but many suggested that the driver slowed the car and then hit the accelerator a second time, mowing down nearly 40 people.

At the time, the woman said that she couldn’t explain what happened, and she’d lost control of the car.

  • Per ABC News: “KSNV-TV says the crash occurred in front of the Paris Hotel & Casino and Planet Hollywood Las Vegas Resort & Casino on South Las Vegas Boulevard, north of Harmon Avenue. The crash took place about 6 p.m. The Miss Universe pageant was being held at the Planet Hollywood at the time of the crash.”

Later, news reports said she’d tested positive for marijuana, but that’s odd, as well. Per the University of Washington, “Marijuana usually has a sedating effect on most users, making it much less likely to cause violence…” Nevertheless, she described being under stress, and that can be a factor in violent behavior.

Second Las Vegas Anomaly

Meanwhile, a few hundred yards away, the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino was hosting the 2015 Miss Universe pageant.

In a baffling blunder, Steve Harvey, an experienced entertainer, crowned the wrong contestant. It’s still unclear whether he misread the card — truly odd for someone accustomed to reading from cards — or if the teleprompter script was wrong.

No matter what the explanation, Harvey crowned Miss Colombia… and then had to remove the crown and announce that Miss Philippines was the real winner.

Third Anomaly

Two nights later, Las Vegas was one of the most-reported viewing points for a bright light soaring through the night sky. Officials explained it as space debris from a Russian rocket.

That’s nothing baffling, but it is odd, since the Las Vegas sky is so well-lit by traffic and commercial signs, anything in the sky must be extraordinarily bright.

Mandela Effect Reports

Initially, readers alerted me to these “coincidences” here at my Mandela Effect website. Some pointed to a Columbia/Colombia issue that could mean something.

However, as the stories unfolded, I couldn’t see a clear connection to an alternate reality.

On the other hand, when I see an odd series of events like this — close in time and location — I note it as a data point to add to my ley line research. I describe these as “blips” and I look for related, consistent paranormal reports that follow the same patterns.

If you can shed some light on this, let me know.


And then there’s this note: “In September 2005, three tourists were killed and nearly a dozen injured when a car barreled through the crowd on the Las Vegas Strip and crashed into a cement barrier in front of Bally’s hotel-casino.” That’s from CBS News.

[Comments are now closed. Thanks to those who left useful insights. Every data point can help this community find new ways to look at the Mandela Effect and paranormal research. Thanks again!]