September 22/23… a Strange Date?

22 SeptemberVery recently, visitors have commented about strangeness around September 22nd (not just one year, but many), and how some September 22nd events seem to cross over so it later looks as if they happened on the 23rd, and vice versa.

This is odd enough and coming from so many sources, with strong reference points, I’m starting an article about it, and moving some related comments here.

September 22nd is often the date of an equinox in the northern & southern hemispheres. As such, that makes it a “between” time, generally noted for anomalies.

And, as some have noted, 22 Sep 2011 is the date CERN appeared to have proved Einstein’s Theory of Relativity incorrect. See, CNRS video (YouTube), Slate’s faulty cable explanation (YouTube), and why the speed of light matters, per Trekspertise (YouTube), which — at about 5:41 — shows that CERN isn’t the only interested party.

Other than that, here are some notes about September 22nd, in case they seem significant:

One of my related comments:

I’m suddenly seeing a series of reports related to September 22nd.

Why September 22nd…? I mean, I suppose it’s as good a date as any, but is this anything more than coincidence? I haven’t a clue. Is that date significant or is it a trail from something else related to that date, in another universe? (Maybe their 9/11 was 9/22…?) Again, I’m not sure if I’m looking for something that simply isn’t there.

If you have insights about September 22nd and related dates, I hope you’ll share them in comments, below. It’s an interesting topic that may relate to the Mandela Effect… or it might not. Only time will tell.

Comments Out of Order, Missing, and Delayed

I’m receiving increasing comments and emails about the comments at this site being out of order — literally, in the case of the Forrest Gump comments, which are far more out-of-sequence than I’d realized. Other comments are missing or delayed.

This isn’t a new issue, but it reached an impossible level in the past week. Overnight, several people contacted me with their comment issues, so we’re making site software changes right now.

We’ve removed some WordPress plugins we’ve been using, and — in most, not all cases — replaced them with something different. For example, we’ve changed the Contact form software. Also, I’ve decided to temporarily phase out polls, as that software has the most “permissions” (ability to change things at this site) of all the plugins the site uses.

While we try to get to the root of this, if any other comments seem lost or show up very late, or if someone’s reply (including mine) seems unlike him or her, let me know right away.

(Also, a helpful reminder from Martin Williams: Clearing your browser cache may reveal many new comments not previously seen.)


  • I am able to move comments from one article to another, when the comment is unsuited to the topic.
  • I cannot move comments from one position in the thread to another.
  • I still delete comments that seem unnecessarily inflammatory (see Terms: Comments) and edit those that have some importance but some difficulties, as well.

Thanks for your patience and understanding while this gets sorted.

Forrest Gump – Life IS like a box of chocolates, or Life WAS like a box of chocolates?

If you recall the famous line from the Forrest Gump movie, which of the following did Forrest say?

a. “Life was like a box of chocolates…”

b. “Life is like a box of chocolates…”

The answer in this reality is A: “Life was like a box of chocolates…”

In my original response to this issue, I said:

Forrest Gump’s accent is fairly heavy, and he doesn’t always enunciate clearly, but — the the film clip ( — I hear “was” far more than “is.”

Here’s that clip from the film.

Also ref:

Appeared in the 1994 film Forrest Gump, when the lead character Forrest Gump (played by Tom Hanks) says “Mama always said life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.” [Emphasis added.]

The book Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami, first published in Japanese in 1987, and in English in 1989, has the following: “Just remember, life is like a box of chocolates.” … “You know, they’ve got these chocolate assortments, and you like some but you don’t like others? And you eat all the ones you like, and the only ones left are the ones you don’t like as much? I always think about that when something painful comes up. “Now I just have to polish these off, and everything’ll be OK.’ Life is a box of chocolates.”

I’m not sure how much accent and enunciation, as well as pop culture references, have contributed to this apparent alternate memory. So, I can’t say this is a Mandela Effect issue.

However, one-for-one, everyone I’ve asked in real life about this quotation has been 100% certain the line was “Life is like a box of chocolates…”

Challenger Explosion – 1984, 1985, 1986?

In this reality, the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded in January 1986. However, it’s clear that many others recall it exploding earlier. (Also, the Columbia disaster was much later in 2003, so it’s not a simple name confusion.)

In fact, in 2010 — before the Challenger topic became popular at this website — someone actually posted a Challenger explosion video at YouTube, and labeled it as a 1984 event. Was that deliberate misinformation, or the result of someone else’s alternate memory? (That’s a rhetorical question no one can answer with available data.)

One of the first references to an alternate Challenger memory was posted in 2012 by colin:

Secondly,and most importantly is the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle.I was in my final year of junior school and there was a TV set that was swithed on in the dinner hall to show pupils what had happened.I know every detail of that room,the position of the TV and various people including a girl that i fancied who spoke to me for the first time ever that day.That day however was in 1983 and NOT 1986 as other websites would have me believe.There is no way in hell it happened in my later school in 1986 because certain people,including that girl never went there.We also never had that dinner hall with the TV set which was used at other times to show us educational schools programs.

I’ve moved most of the Challenger-specific comments to this post. So, starting now, this is the best place for Challenger-related comments and conversations.

Sports Events and the Mandela Effect

Discussions about sports events and outcomes — and how they relate to the Mandela Effect — have appeared in a few comment threads. They’re so distinct from our usual conversations, I’m creating this post early, because this could either spiral into something big… or fall flat.

I’m not sure what to expect, but — so far — some good points have been raised:

  • With all the celebrity-related memories, why do we have so few reported variations in how sports events concluded?
  • Since a different outcome of a particular game or match can then cascade and affect an entire season, it seems to me that alternate outcomes would be distinctly different memories — perhaps more extended — than alternate events in other areas of pop culture (TV shows, book titles, etc.)

Except for the America’s Cup, I don’t follow much in the sporting world. So, in that field, I’m not likely to reply, “I remember that, too.”

However, when sports topics was raised here, I began wondering why so few alternate memories include that subject, when it could be a fertile area of study to learn more about the Mandela Effect.

Or, I might speculate that the emotional fervor invested in sporting events is so intense, it blots out alternate memories… or that, across most realities, the same teams or individuals always win.

What are your thoughts and — if you have any — your alternate sports memories?